Machine Code – 1C Plus Plus Street http://1cplusplusstreet.com/ Wed, 25 May 2022 15:09:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Machine Code – 1C Plus Plus Street http://1cplusplusstreet.com/ 32 32 Record labels want viral TikToks. Artists like Halsey push back. https://1cplusplusstreet.com/record-labels-want-viral-tiktoks-artists-like-halsey-push-back/ Wed, 25 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/record-labels-want-viral-tiktoks-artists-like-halsey-push-back/ Placeholder while loading article actions Halsey posted a TikTok this week with the effect of a hostage video. In it, she stares blankly at the camera as words appear on screen: “Basically I have a song that I love and want to get out as soon as possible, but my label doesn’t not allow me. […]]]>
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Halsey posted a TikTok this week with the effect of a hostage video. In it, she stares blankly at the camera as words appear on screen: “Basically I have a song that I love and want to get out as soon as possible, but my label doesn’t not allow me. I’ve been in this industry for 8 years and I’ve sold over 165 million records and my record label says I can’t release it unless they can fake a viral moment on tiktok.

Ironically, this very ICT Tac gone viral — getting the attention the label wanted, but with outrage at its heart. Some wondered if it was the marketing ploy. Others rallied around Halsey, who uses the pronouns she/they, arguing that they “should be able to release music the way you want”. Fellow performer King Princess wrote, “Tell the girls!!!!”

The relationship between musical artists and their labels has always been tenuous, often a headache over creative desires and business strategies; Sara Bareilles said last year that her 2007 hit “Love Song,” in which she sings that she’s “not gonna write you a love song / Because you asked for it, because you need one”, doubled as a frustrated response to “feeling invisible” to his label, which she told Glamor magazine she felt “held back” because she didn’t have a big radio-ready single.

But Halsey’s complaints have shed light on the specific strain some artists experience when they’re supposed to produce additional content for TikTok, a platform that tends to reject artificiality. Teams of people contribute to marketing campaigns, but TikTok’s viral moments often depend on the authenticity of the artists themselves creating the videos. It works for artists like Doja Cat, who is particularly adept at perform for an online audiencewhile others find it a less natural task.

“When the music is done and you’re a major label artist, it traditionally takes a while before it comes out,” said Marc Plotkin, a music business professor at New York University who led marketing campaigns for independent and major labels. “They don’t wait that long because they have to make CDs, like in the 90s. They want to get enough attention. The shortcut to this is if you have millions of followers on TikTok.

After Halsey’s TikTok, social media users started circulating other examples of major artists speaking out against similar expectations. Months ago, Charli XCX mentioned that her label had asked her “to do my 8th tiktok of the week.” In March, Florence Welch from Florence and the Machine posted a video singing a cappella because “labels beg me to have ‘low fi tik toks'”. In a since-deleted post, FKA branches mentioned she “got scolded today for not trying hard enough”.

Ed Sheeran filmed himself eating crisps for 15 seconds straight, adding a text overlay: “When you’re supposed to do promos for your song, but you really want a snack and you decide that eating a snack might be promo for a song because everyone loves snacks.”

According to Plotkin, TikTok dominates marketing conversations more than other platforms have in the past, be it Facebook or Instagram. But the attention can be a little misleading, he said, adding that he’s “entirely into converting to platforms like Spotify or Apple Music.” We might have a TikTok video that gets 4 million plays, and 15 of those people want to go listen.

Brandon Stosuy, a music executive who co-founded the Zone 6 company, found the intense focus on TikTok a natural extension of how labels have always operated. He recalled when, in the early 1990s, labels rushed to sign grunge bands in response to the massive success of Nirvana.

“Some things were signed that were good, some were terrible, some didn’t make sense,” Stosuy said. “It’s the trend you see with major and independent labels over the years, where something works for one person so they want to recreate that success for another person. You can’t predict TikTok, if anything going viral or not. It’s hard to recreate that.

Having grown up with the internet, younger consumers tend to be more savvy than older generations when it comes to detecting if online content is fabricated. Stosuy pointed out that this is why unexpected viral sensations have the most impact. Belarusian post-punk band Molchat Doma, for example, became a meme when teenagers used their music in TikToks to channel what Pitchfork described as “Soviet vibe. Admittedly, the independent label Sacred Bones had not foreseen this.

But smaller artists are still under pressure to pursue this unlikely success, especially as they try to catch the attention of TikTok tuned labels. Plotkin described the dynamic as “an early-stage A&R cheat code,” an easy way to source talent based on a quantified level of interest.

None of this is very romantic, and singers involved in the marketing process — especially those who have already amassed an audience and could arguably be successful without TikTok fame — say these considerations take away from the artistry involved. In an interview in November, Adele said she responded to his label’s request for her to do TikToks with, “Tika Toka, who?”

“It was like everyone was making music for the TikTok, who was making music for my generation?” Adele continued. “Who makes music for my peers? I would do this job with pleasure.

Singer-songwriter Vérité, who has released music independently since 2014, said it’s “really disheartening when technology and culture evolve in a way that…is so obviously driven by pure consumerism “. Deciding to stay independent was difficult, she said, but it ultimately translated into her desire to retain her autonomy and control over her music and overall vision.

“The majors system is a gamble,” she said. “When it pays off and it works well, it’s great and you can become extremely successful. You can become famous and you can have number 1s and all dreams come true. If it’s not going well – which it is, let’s be honest, most of the time – a lot of artists are stuck. They are unable to monetize and do not have ownership of their work. »

Some artists end up leaving labels altogether, an easier choice when they already have an audience. John Mayer announced in March that he decided not to renew his contract with Columbia Records and “hasn’t signed another one because he doesn’t really need to”, according to Plotkin.

Artists bound by agreements with their labels may envy this freedom, but some, including Halsey, don’t seem to have been prevented from saying the same. Doja Cat’s Eve posted an extremely stupid and soon to go viral TikTok mourning the loss of Taco Bell’s abandoned Mexican pizza, she shared another warning viewers of the “terrible” video to come.

“Just know,” she said, “it’s contractual.”

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Late antiques dealer Forrest Fenn, who hid a $2 million treasure chest in the mountains, heads to auction https://1cplusplusstreet.com/late-antiques-dealer-forrest-fenn-who-hid-a-2-million-treasure-chest-in-the-mountains-heads-to-auction/ Mon, 23 May 2022 21:49:57 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/late-antiques-dealer-forrest-fenn-who-hid-a-2-million-treasure-chest-in-the-mountains-heads-to-auction/ In 2010, New Mexico art and antiques dealer Forrest Fenn infamously hid a Romanesque bronze chest filled with approximately $2 million in gold coins and other valuables somewhere in the Rocky Mountains. , then challenged the world to find it. The hunt ended in June 2020, just months before Fenn died at 90, when an […]]]>

In 2010, New Mexico art and antiques dealer Forrest Fenn infamously hid a Romanesque bronze chest filled with approximately $2 million in gold coins and other valuables somewhere in the Rocky Mountains. , then challenged the world to find it.

The hunt ended in June 2020, just months before Fenn died at 90, when an explorer finally found the treasure. But now the rest of the world has a chance to own a piece from Fenn’s legendary art collection, when it’s auctioned off by his family in Hindman in Cincinnati, Ohio on June 9.

The sale, titled “Native American Art: Forrest Fenn’s Lifetime Collectionwill feature 168 lots, including an assortment of beads, taken from her museum-like home.

“Beads from various Plains tribes filled two entire walls and one table displayed a collection of rare Plains dolls. The collection spilled over onto the floor, under tables and over doors,” Hindman vice president Wes Cowan said in a statement. statement.

Sioux twist pipe stem with catlinite bowl once owned by Sitting Bull, estimated between $60,000 and $80,000. Photo courtesy of Hindman, Chicago.

The best lots of the sale should include a Sioux twist pipe stem with a catlinite bowl once belonging to Sitting Bull, estimated between $60,000 and $80,000, and a Sioux grizzly bear claw necklacewhich could fetch between $40,000 and $60,000).

A pair of Cochiti storage jars from Fenn’s extensive Pueblo pottery collection are expected to sell for $20,000 to $30,000, while Native American dolls featured in his book Historic American Indian Dolls include examples fetching up to $25,000. dollars.

19th century Sioux grizzly bear claw necklace, estimated between $40,000 and $60,000.  Photo courtesy of Hindman, Chicago.

19th century Sioux grizzly bear claw necklace, estimated between $40,000 and $60,000. Photo courtesy of Hindman, Chicago.

Other highlights include photos of Native Americans taken by the William J. Lenny and William L. Sawyers photo studio in Purcell, Oklahoma, including a selection of 19 portraits of Quanah Parker, a prominent Kwahadi Comanche leader, estimated at between 10 $000 and $15,000 to Position it.

“Forrest began collecting at a young age, traveling the plains of Texas and the mountains of Montana in search of arrowheads. He was hooked,” Fenn’s family wrote in the introduction to the auction catalog. “He loved the allure of ancient places and the tradition of ancient people. This magnificent collection illustrates a lifetime of dedication and passion for Native American arts and all that surrounds the West.

Quanah Parker (1845-1911) photographs taken by the studio of William J. Lenny and William L. Sawyers, from the collection of Forrest Fenn, estimated between $10,000 and $15,000.  Photo courtesy of Hindman, Chicago.

Quanah Parker (1845-1911) photographs taken by the studio of William J. Lenny and William L. Sawyers, from the collection of Forrest Fenn, estimated between $10,000 and $15,000. Photo courtesy of Hindman, Chicago.

An Air Force veteran, Fenn got his start in the art world in the 1970s as a partner in the Arrowsmith-Fenn Gallery in Santa Fe, which eventually became the Fenn Gallery. The gallery specializing in Native American art and the Taos School of Southwestern artists.

“Fenn was a celebrated figure in the world of Native American and Western art collectors, and the auction offers bidders a unique opportunity to acquire works by a legendary collector,” added Danica Farnand, Vice President of Hindman for Native American Art.

Large Cochiti pottery storage jar from the collection of Forrest Fenn, estimated between $20,000 and $30,000.  Photo courtesy of Hindman, Chicago.

Large Cochiti pottery storage jar from the collection of Forrest Fenn, estimated between $20,000 and $30,000. Photo courtesy of Hindman, Chicago.

Fenn began his treasure hunt in 2010, with the publication of his self-published memoir, The thrill of the hunt. The book ended with a riddle in the form of a cryptic poem which, if solved, would lead the reader to the hidden gold.

The challenge has spawned an enthusiastic community of treasure hunters, many of whom have spent years searching for the hidden chest. The search proved deadly at times, with five treasure hunters dying while on the trail of Fenn’s elusive riches.

Forrest Fenn's treasure is said to be in an ornate Romanesque box filled with gold nuggets, gold coins, and other precious stones.  Courtesy of Forrest Fenn.

Forrest Fenn’s treasure is said to have been buried in an ornate Romanesque box filled with gold nuggets, gold coins and other precious stones. Courtesy of Forrest Fenn.

A 32-year-old medical student from Michigan, Jonathan “Jack” Stuef, finally cracked the code, discovering the treasure in a still unknown location in Wyoming. Stuef would consider auctioning off the contents of the vault.

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‘The world needs you,’ Northeast President Aoun told BC High https://1cplusplusstreet.com/the-world-needs-you-northeast-president-aoun-told-bc-high/ Sat, 21 May 2022 20:53:19 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/the-world-needs-you-northeast-president-aoun-told-bc-high/ Northeast President Joseph E. Aoun delivered the keynote speech at Boston College High School Saturday, urging graduates to embrace flexibility while exploring their future in unexpected ways. “I know that sounds strange coming from a university president,” Aoun said from the outdoor podium on a pleasant spring morning. “Half of what you learn in the […]]]>

Northeast President Joseph E. Aoun delivered the keynote speech at Boston College High School Saturday, urging graduates to embrace flexibility while exploring their future in unexpected ways.

“I know that sounds strange coming from a university president,” Aoun said from the outdoor podium on a pleasant spring morning. “Half of what you learn in the classroom will be out of date very soon after you graduate. That’s why what happens in class isn’t the most important part of college. It’s the whole experience that counts.

Aoun’s advice was welcome on this day of post-pandemic renewal as the BC High community came together to celebrate its new class of 284 graduates. Some 2,000 people attended the ceremony in person to accompany nearly 1,000 people who watched online.

The school’s 158th start offered some well-deserved perspective moments, including a shout-out from Grace Cotter Regan, the school president, to honor members of the Class of 1972 who had returned for their golden reunion. .

“BC High is in a period of rebirth, where we are examining the way we teach and learn with a new focus,” said Regan, who noted that the institution’s core mission is to create leaders who “will courageously respond to the challenges of the times. because they want to help and serve others.

Aoun was comfortable in this setting. He told graduates that he, too, benefited from a Jesuit education growing up in Lebanon, a tradition among the boys in his family, and that he was inspired to become a linguist and move to the United States by his mentor in Saint Joseph University of Beirut, Father Peter-Hans Kovenbach.

“As the president of an academic institution, I can tell you that there is no firmer foundation on which to build a flourishing life of the spirit, as well as a life of action and impact. “, said Aoun. “Every day, I rely on the values ​​I learned at Notre Dame College in Lebanon. These are the same ones taught here: competence, awareness and compassion. It’s a powerful combination.

Sean Murphy, identified by faculty as an academic and athletic star who helped bring the school together, focused his senior class talk on the gains made by his fellow students while isolated by COVID-19 and after their return on the campus.

“There was a noticeable difference in how we interacted with our classmates, all because of the common struggle we had been through during the pandemic,” Murphy said. “Also, people started showing up for each other outside the school walls. When someone needed support after losing a family member or friend, their classmates were there.

Aoun’s speech was intended to lend support to the majority of graduates moving on to college, including several who will attend Northeastern. He offered three lessons that he called counter-intuitive:

  1. Don’t have a plan.
  2. Get out of class.
  3. The reinvention never stops.

He reminded graduates that the unfortunate surprises of the COVID-19 pandemic had strengthened them with “a resilience that may have surprised you and your families.”


Knowing that future events defy prediction, he warned graduates that the average student changes major three times. He cited this as a positive moving into the next phase of their lives.

“Exploration is one of the most exciting parts of higher education,” he said. “Exploration of new interests and new ideas. Explore the world. And of yourself.

Now is not the time for ironclad plans, Aoun insisted in affirmation of Lesson 1.

“It’s time to decide who you want to be and what you want to do,” he said.

Getting out of the classroom – Lesson No. 2 – is the first step to experiential learning, he said.

“Experiential learning is the most powerful way to turn knowledge into ability,” Aoun said. “Co-ops, internships, service, entrepreneurship, solving real problems: the world needs you.

“The climate crisis, pandemics, racial inequalities, our challenges are complex.”

Pursuing growth experiences shouldn’t be a lonely endeavor, Aoun said while citing the powerful networks that were developed by Dr. Martin Luther, Steve Jobs and other visionary leaders.

“Teamwork means getting along with people who have significant, sometimes boring differences in perspective,” Aoun said. “Learning to accept this diversity is a big part of college. And it’s a big part of living in our interconnected world.

He explained Lesson 3 – the need for reinvention – with reference to the global realities of technological change.

“Artificial intelligence, machine learning and genetic engineering are disrupting all professions,” Aoun said. “Whether you are a doctor, airline pilot, journalist, nurse or engineer, you will need to retrain or even reinvent yourself. Work is increasingly automated, so humans will need to focus on what machines cannot imitate: imagination, creativity, empathy, cultural agility.

“Because technology never stops, reinvention can’t stop,” he continued. “It may seem uncomfortable. Your life path is not defined once and for all. But reinvention will lead you to discover new horizons and new passions. I assure you there is joy in reinvention.

As he gazed at the audience of graduates in their white tuxedo jackets and brown bow ties, Aoun jokingly apologized for not following the dress code.

“I’ve never seen a bunch of better-dressed graduates,” Aoun said. “And I spent 25 years in Hollywood.”

For media inquiriesplease contact media@northeastern.edu.

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Printing Error Affects Mail-In Ballots in Pennsylvania County | Pennsylvania News https://1cplusplusstreet.com/printing-error-affects-mail-in-ballots-in-pennsylvania-county-pennsylvania-news/ Tue, 17 May 2022 19:04:00 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/printing-error-affects-mail-in-ballots-in-pennsylvania-county-pennsylvania-news/ By GEOFF MULVIHILL and MICHAEL RUBINKAM, Associated Press An error by a company that prints ballots for several counties in Pennsylvania rendered thousands of mail-in ballots unreadable on Tuesday as voters decided the hotly contested primaries for governor and the U.S. Senate in one of the Most important battleground states in the country. Officials in […]]]>

By GEOFF MULVIHILL and MICHAEL RUBINKAM, Associated Press

An error by a company that prints ballots for several counties in Pennsylvania rendered thousands of mail-in ballots unreadable on Tuesday as voters decided the hotly contested primaries for governor and the U.S. Senate in one of the Most important battleground states in the country.

Officials in Lancaster County, the state’s sixth most populous, said the problem involved at least 21,000 mail-in ballots, only a third of which were properly scanned. The problem will require election workers to remake ballots that cannot be read by the machine, a laborious process that is expected to take several days. Officials in the GOP-controlled county promised that all ballots would eventually be counted.

“Citizens deserve to have accurate election results and they deserve to have them on election night, not days later,” said Josh Parsons, a Republican and vice chairman of the County Board of Commissioners, at the a press conference. “But because of that, we’re not going to have the final election results from those mail-in ballots for probably several days, so it’s very, very frustrating for us.

The Lancaster Board of Elections, of which Parsons is a member, renewed its criticism of a 2019 state voting law that expanded mail-in voting but barred counties from opening mail-in ballots before Election Day. ballot to check for errors.

political cartoons

The council said the law, which was passed by the legislature with bipartisan support, also requires counties to use vendors to print ballots rather than do them in-house.

“Bill 77 is untenable for us as counties to continue to work through elections and not have issues like this,” said Ray D’Agostino, chairman of the Lancaster board of directors.

The vendor’s mistake left county officials with the task of hand-marking thousands of new ballots, a process that was scheduled to begin Wednesday morning. For ballots that will not be scanned, county election officials will recreate the voters’ choices on the blank ballots and then scan them.

Lancaster County had to use a similar process in the primaries last year due to a printing error by another vendor.

Christa Miller, chief voter registration clerk, said one election worker will read each voter’s choices, a second worker will record them on a blank ballot, and an observer will make sure the choices are correctly marked.

“Our main priority is precision, not how quickly we can do something,” she said.

County officials said the contractor, the Claysburg, Pa.-based NPC, sent county test slips with the correct ID code, but used the wrong code on those sent to voters.

NPC, which replaced the terminated vendor after last year’s error, did not immediately respond to a message seeking comment. D’Agostino said NPC took “full responsibility”.

The Pennsylvania State Department said it is aware of the problem in Lancaster County, which opted for Donald Trump by about 16 percentage points over Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential race. Ellen Lyon said no other counties have reported similar issues.

In North Carolina, election officials were investigating delays at some polling places.

Karen Brinson Bell, executive director of the North Carolina State Board of Elections, said officials are looking into whether problems with voting machines delayed the opening of polls in three counties — Gates, Warren and Wilson. . Officials were trying to determine whether the delays were preventing anyone from voting and whether voting hours should be extended.

“With over 2,600 polls open and the possibility of delays in three, I think that’s a pretty good batting average,” Bell said on a conference call with reporters.

North Carolina voters cast about 580,000 early ballots, the vast majority of them at in-person polling places. That’s more than twice as many early votes as in the 2018 primary.

Bell said the high turnout “is indicative, we hope, of the faith and trust of the people of North Carolina in the election officials who run the election for them.”

Copyright 2022 The Associated press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Tarentum fights the scourge and designates 9 homes for sentencing https://1cplusplusstreet.com/tarentum-fights-the-scourge-and-designates-9-homes-for-sentencing/ Sun, 15 May 2022 18:01:00 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/tarentum-fights-the-scourge-and-designates-9-homes-for-sentencing/ The Council of Tarentum continues its fight against the blight until 2022 by considering nine structures to be demolished by the end of the year. The council on Tuesday cleared the houses – four on the east side of the town and five on the west – to be designated for sentencing. They are: • […]]]>

The Council of Tarentum continues its fight against the blight until 2022 by considering nine structures to be demolished by the end of the year.

The council on Tuesday cleared the houses – four on the east side of the town and five on the west – to be designated for sentencing.

They are:

• 520 E. Fifth Avenue.

• 505-507 E. Eighth Avenue.

• 529 E. Ninth Avenue.

• 628-630 E. Ninth Avenue.

• 338 W. 10th Ave.

• 110 W. 11th Ave.

• 1219 Pitcairn Avenue.

• 105 Britton Road.

The property along West 10th contains two structures, said code enforcement officer Anthony Bruni.

Each of the nine buildings has unresolved code violations that could lead to health and safety risks, Borough Manager Michael Nestico said.

“Considering these convicts as the result of their condition,” he said. “These are all dangerous, and owners are not surprised by this designation.”

The duplex along East Eighth has holes in the roof and a collapsed foundation, Bruni said.

It is marked with a red and white “X” on the front to warn police and emergency responders to be extremely careful and limit outdoor operations.

Similarly, one of the houses along East Ninth has floors that have collapsed.

Nestico said borough officials made several attempts to contact owners about the security concerns.

Pointing them out for sentencing will not prevent someone from making the necessary repairs, he said. It just pushes the process forward.

“You’re not going to bring in a machine and take it apart when they say they want to fix it, but they’re really going to have to step in,” Nestico said. “They had plenty of time to do it. All of these have been in disrepair for some time.

“If you get to the demo stage and the repairs are still not done, they will be in line to be demolished.”

Bruni said he plans to solicit bids in the coming weeks and hopes to have the buildings razed early in the fall.

Tarentum officials worked to rid the borough of eyesores and dilapidated properties.

Last year, 26 abandoned houses were demolished. Council Speaker Scott Dadowski said these efforts are helping to reduce crime and deter vandalism.

It also helps put properties back on tax lists by making them attractive to people who want to reuse space, he said.

Tawnya Panizzi is editor of Tribune-Review. You can contact Tawnya at 724-226-7726, tpanizzi@triblive.com or via Twitter .

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Machine Gun Kelly’s inspired by Megan Fox, ‘The Da Vinci Code’ https://1cplusplusstreet.com/machine-gun-kellys-inspired-by-megan-fox-the-da-vinci-code/ Fri, 13 May 2022 19:07:11 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/machine-gun-kellys-inspired-by-megan-fox-the-da-vinci-code/ Machine Gun Kelly just made his directorial debut with the stoner comedy Hello. Kelly was first inspired to write the film when he received a cryptic text from his fiancée Megan Fox before she went on a trip. Although it was before the two started dating, the post caused Kelly to drift away from the […]]]>

Machine Gun Kelly just made his directorial debut with the stoner comedy Hello. Kelly was first inspired to write the film when he received a cryptic text from his fiancée Megan Fox before she went on a trip. Although it was before the two started dating, the post caused Kelly to drift away from the supposed meaning behind it. He spoke to Marc Malkin about Variety about this heartbreaking experience.

“So I was just stuck, like, sitting there trying to decode this text. And it was like the Da Vinci Code. I went to all these places, like what does that mean? does that mean? And not everyone I was getting relationship advice from was in a relationship. So that led me down a long, dark, terrible road.

This route led him to write a 150-page screenplay by the time Fox returned to town.

“I was like, ‘I need you to sit down. I need to read this to you. And then I read it all and she was like, ‘That’s what there was. in your head? Nothing’s wrong. Like rereading the text. That’s what I said. It’s really funny how things go. We always butt heads. We put ourselves in our own way. »

According to Variety, the film is about “film star London Ransom, whose world is turned upside down when he receives a breakup text from the love of his life on the day of the most important meeting of his career”. Sound familiar? Kelly went on to explain how her character in Hello compares to him in real life. “

“A lot of this character that you look at in the movie is me in real life. Like I’m a very nice, lost, gentle boy at heart and I feel like the world kind of toughens me up and that I have to defend myself.

Kelly directed the film with fellow musician Mod Sun and the pair also wrote and starred in it. The film also stars Fox as one of Kelly’s roommates along with Becky G, Whitney Cummings, Dove Cameron, GaTa, Zach Villa, Jenna Boyd, and Pete Davidson.

Kelly was thrilled to feature Fox in her film to highlight her favorite aspects about her. “

“I love that she has become my favorite thing about her – how funny she is and how witty she is”

Hello will be released on May 20 on video on demand as well as a limited theatrical release.

]]> UK punishes Putin with new round of sanctions on £1.7bn worth of goods https://1cplusplusstreet.com/uk-punishes-putin-with-new-round-of-sanctions-on-1-7bn-worth-of-goods/ Sun, 08 May 2022 21:35:06 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/uk-punishes-putin-with-new-round-of-sanctions-on-1-7bn-worth-of-goods/ Russian and Belarusian regimes targeted by new package of trade sanctions on goods. New import duties on goods worth £1.4billion, including platinum and palladium. Export bans worth more than £250million target Russia’s manufacturing and heavy machinery sectors. The UK is today announcing a new sanctions package against Russia and Belarus targeting £1.7billion of trade in […]]]>
  • Russian and Belarusian regimes targeted by new package of trade sanctions on goods.
  • New import duties on goods worth £1.4billion, including platinum and palladium.
  • Export bans worth more than £250million target Russia’s manufacturing and heavy machinery sectors.

The UK is today announcing a new sanctions package against Russia and Belarus targeting £1.7billion of trade in a bid to further weaken Putin’s war machine.

This will bring the total value of products subject to full or partial import and export sanctions since the start of Russia’s illegal invasion of Ukraine to more than £4 billion.

The sanctions announced today by the Secretary for International Trade and the Chancellor of the Exchequer include import duties and export bans.

The new import tariffs will cover £1.4bn worth of goods – including platinum and palladium – hampering Putin’s ability to fund his war effort.

Russia is one of the major platinum and palladium producing countries and is heavily dependent on the UK for exports of platinum and palladium products.

Meanwhile, the planned export bans aim to hit more than £250m worth of goods in the sectors of the Russian economy most dependent on UK goods, targeting key materials such as chemicals, plastics, rubber and machinery.

Secretary of State for International Trade, Anne-Marie Trevelyan said:

We are determined to do all we can to thwart Putin’s goals in Ukraine and undermine his illegal invasion, which saw barbaric acts perpetrated against the Ukrainian people.

This far-reaching sanctions package will inflict further damage on the Russian war machine. This is part of a larger coordinated effort by the many countries around the world that are horrified by Russia’s conduct and determined to use our economic power to persuade Putin to change course.

Chancellor of the Exchequer, Rishi Sunak said:

Putin’s illegal invasion of Ukraine is causing widespread suffering. His barbaric war must be stopped.

More than £4billion worth of goods will now be subject to import and export sanctions, causing significant damage to Putin’s war effort. By working closely with our allies, we can and will thwart Putin’s ambitions.

This is the third wave of trade sanctions announced by the UK government and, excluding gold and energy, will bring the proportion of imports of goods from Russia hit by restrictions to more than 96%, with more than 60% of goods exports to Russia under all or partial restrictions, effectively contributing to the weakening of Putin’s war machine.

Last week, the International Trade Secretary hosted international trade ministers and officials from 23 countries, including Ukraine’s First Deputy Prime Minister, to discuss how best to provide trade and economic support to Ukraine.

She also signed a formal exchange of letters to liberalize all customs duties on imports from Ukraine under the UK-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement.

Background:

  • The UK announced an additional set of £1.4bn import restrictions, raising tariffs by 35 percentage points on goods such as chemicals, platinum and palladium.
  • The announced measures will cover more than £250m of UK exports and accounted for almost 10% of UK exports to Russia in 2021.
  • Overall, the UK has now announced import restrictions on more than £2.4bn of imports from Russia, excluding energy-related announcements.
  • Around £1.4bn of imports will face an additional 35 percentage point duty.
  • Legislation will be tabled in due course to implement these measures.
  • These estimates assume that the total trade value within a product code is restricted. Actual value may be subject to licenses and exemptions.
  • We encourage all importers who use Russian imports to source alternatively. As with all sanctions, these measures will be reviewed.
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Covid memorials offer a place to put our grief https://1cplusplusstreet.com/covid-memorials-offer-a-place-to-put-our-grief/ Fri, 06 May 2022 23:56:00 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/covid-memorials-offer-a-place-to-put-our-grief/ The pandemic has made illness and isolation a constant in our society. It also produced an enormous amount of grief. In the United States alone, people are mourning the nearly one million lives lost to the coronavirus. How do we make sense of our losses as we experience them? How to move forward and look […]]]>

The pandemic has made illness and isolation a constant in our society. It also produced an enormous amount of grief. In the United States alone, people are mourning the nearly one million lives lost to the coronavirus. How do we make sense of our losses as we experience them? How to move forward and look back at the same time? Our leaders offered few spaces or moments for reflection, so artists, as they often do, stepped in to fill the void. Four projects currently on view in New York take up the work of memorials and monuments: They give us a place to put our grief, a place to store it so it doesn’t just reside in our bodies and minds.

In 2020, for a project entitled “Tender,” the artist Jill Magid had 120,000 cents – the sum of a federal stimulus check – engraved with the words “The body was already so fragile”. Magid brought the coins into circulation by spending them and sometimes donating them to bodegas around New York. The idea was to make people think about the connections between economic and social conditions: the coins spread through human interaction, like the virus, and “the body” could refer to the physical coins or to an already vulnerable body politic. Magid documented the process, which took place during the lockdown, and created a short film that anchors his new installation, “Presence of call for tendersproduced by public art organization Creative Time.

The first thing you see when you enter the once grand Dime Savings Bank of Williamsburgh are rows of bouquets in green buckets, as if still on sale at the bodegas where they were purchased. The display is a poignant riff on the custom of using flowers to mourn the dead, even more charged with the knowledge that the flowers are already dying. Behind them is a large screen; depending on when you attend, you can sit and watch Magid’s 29-minute film with musicians playing around you.

The live score – composed by T. Griffin, with sound design by Eric Sluyter — is haunting, sometimes jarring and often tense, as if accompanying a thriller. During one section, a musician slams down a repetitive, pulsing rhythm, punctuated with regular puffs on a flute. The screen shows a tattoo artist at work, followed by a machine carving pennies from Magid – creative marks on different body types. The beat gives way to wavering, buzzing strings after a shot of an empty stretcher inside a makeshift morgue.

“Tender Presence” is thought-provoking and at times engrossing, but it suffers from being part about Magid’s work and part about the pandemic itself. She connects the two conceptually with images of hands, many using cash to pay for bodega purchases, but the premise of tracking her custom pieces distracts from commentary on how the United States values ​​the economy. in relation to human life. The anonymity and invisibility of the circulation of pennies is what makes it fascinating.

Magid calls “Tender” a “scattered monument”; no doubt it is also Rafael Lozano Hemmerof the Covid-19 project, although his preferred term is “anti-monument”. Called “A Crack in the Hourglass,” it also began in 2020, when Lozano-Hemmer and his assistants built a special sand tracker with a robotic arm and an AI image processor. As participants submit photos of people who have died from the coronavirus via a dedicated website, the machine pulls them into the sand, which trickles out of a partial hourglass-shaped chamber. When the portrait is finished, the plotter scatters it and recycles the sand. Watching this moment of dissolution is particularly moving.

the Brooklyn Museum now hosts the first physical presentation of an “A Crack in the Hourglass”. Filling a single gallery, the exhibit consists of the machine, time-lapse archival videos of the portraits in progress, benches, and grayscale prints of the completed drawings. Despite the plotter’s sophistication, the facility looks deliberately simple, designed to accommodate everyone. And its physicality gives the project new life after two years so intensely virtual; seeing tiled pieces of paper on the wall made the losses they represented seem more real. As one Covid mourner told Ed Yong for a recent piece in The Atlantic: “Putting my grief into a physical thing would take away some of the emotional heaviness.”

This was part of the impetus given to the Postcode Memory Project, which examines the impact of the pandemic on hard-hit neighborhoods in Harlem, Washington Heights and the South Bronx. Sponsored by Columbia University’s Center for the Study of Social Difference, the sprawling project includes workshops, public events and an exhibit at St. John the Divine Cathedral. Entitled “Imagine the repairand curated by Isin Onol, the exhibition features creations by workshop participants and artists, most of whom live or work in the relevant postcodes.

The pieces mostly document on-the-ground experiences of Covid-19. Some of the strongest contributions are the photographs, enhanced by their integration into the architecture of the space. For example, Kamal Badhey“Let Your Heart Be Not Troubled” (202022), a poetic assemblage of words and images about moving in with one’s parents during the pandemic, is laid out on disused benches and laps. Susan MeiselasThe diptych of the doors of his local butcher’s shop – whose owner died of coronavirus – hangs from the imposing doors of the chapel.

Not all work is of the same caliber, but the show excels at sparking specialness and intimacy, such as with the “Depository of Anonymous Feelings” (2022), a hotline New Yorkers can call to share stories. and feelings about the pandemic, created by Chelsea Knight with Candace LeslieSandra Long and Zahid Tony Mohammed. Like “A Crack in the Hourglass,” which is represented in the exhibit by videos, “Imagine Repair” breaks down overwhelming statistics into individual stories, while emphasizing that downtown residents, many of whom are people of color, have been disproportionately affected. by the pandemic and must be heard and honored.

For me, the show’s counterpart is downtown at the Whitney Biennale. Coco FuscoThe 12-minute video “Your Eyes Will Be an Empty Word” (2021) shows the artist rowing a boat around Hart Island, New York’s public cemetery for the unclaimed dead. Where many Covid projects have attempted to pierce the anonymity of numbers with participation and specificity, Fusco has given itself a more difficult task: to commemorate those whose stories we do not know. People love the artist Melinda Hunt have explored this in regards to Hart Island for decades, but Fusco renews the subject with dazzling drone footage and thoughtful text, voiced by the poet Pamela Sneed. “The loss of life becomes a manageable sum,” she said. “We can treat it like a debt that could be canceled one day. Forgiven and forgotten, we will leave.

All of these artists, and many more, are doing their best so that we don’t.

Jill Magid: tender presence

Until May 8. Dime Savings Bank of Williamsburgh, 209 Havemeyer Street, Brooklyn; creativetime.org.

The Postcode Memory Project: Imagine Repair

Until May 15. Cathedral of St. John the Divine, 1047 Amsterdam Avenue, Manhattan; zcmp.org.

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer: A Crack in the Hourglass

Until June 26. Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn; (718) 638-5000; brooklynmuseum.org.

The Whitney Biennale 2022: quiet as it is guarded

Until September 5. Whitney Museum, 99 Gansevoort Street, Manhattan; (212) 570-3600; whitney.org.

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Native American faces tear gas, baton charges and rubber bullets – Camille Seaman’s best photography | Art and design https://1cplusplusstreet.com/native-american-faces-tear-gas-baton-charges-and-rubber-bullets-camille-seamans-best-photography-art-and-design/ Wed, 04 May 2022 14:23:00 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/native-american-faces-tear-gas-baton-charges-and-rubber-bullets-camille-seamans-best-photography-art-and-design/ IIn the United States, hundreds of treaties have been made with Indigenous peoples and not one – not one – has ever been fulfilled. Reserves have been created and it has been said, “This land will be yours from time immemorial”, but then it shrinks and shrinks forever. In 2016, there was a massive protest […]]]>

IIn the United States, hundreds of treaties have been made with Indigenous peoples and not one – not one – has ever been fulfilled. Reserves have been created and it has been said, “This land will be yours from time immemorial”, but then it shrinks and shrinks forever.

In 2016, there was a massive protest against the Dakota Access pipeline. The original plan was for this pipeline to run from the oil fields in the northwest corner of North Dakota through Bismarck, the state’s wealthy capital, and then on to its destination. But someone in Bismarck said, “It’s not okay. It’s dangerous,” because they knew it wasn’t a matter of ifbut when a pipeline will leak.

The pipeline route was therefore changed to cross the Standing Rock Reservation and cross the Missouri River. Standing Rock belongs to the Hunkpapa Lakota, or Sioux, tribe. It is the land of the Sitting Bull people, and the Missouri River provides drinking water to more than 80 million people in the United States.

A woman, LaDonna Brave Bull Allard, appealed on social media saying, “Please come join us in protecting water. I don’t think she had any idea how big it would get. At one point, there were over 30,000 people. They came from Africa, the Maori came from New Zealand, the native Japanese came from Hokkaido, and there were Sami and Tibetan monks. People came from all over the world to say, “Enough is enough”. They came to protect nature, water and the rights of indigenous peoples, and to protest that another treaty was not being respected. It was about not poisoning our the water.

The protest also aimed to physically prevent work from being carried out on the pipeline. When the protests started, I was working on We Are Still Here, a series of photographs of Native Americans. I heard about Standing Rock and knew I had to go record it. I knew it was a historic moment. My mother is part African American, a descendant of slaves, and my father is Shinnecock Montaukett, a small whaling tribe from the tip of Long Island. I didn’t take part in the protests themselves, but I was documenting what was happening. I thought it was important, as an Indigenous person, to have the opportunity to tell the story through an Indigenous lens.

I had to leave at the end of October, when this photo was taken, but the protests lasted all winter. This particular image was the last I did there. The six weeks I was there, I had seen Dan everywhere. I kept saying, “I really want to do a portrait of you,” but there was never an opportunity. The day I was leaving, I saw him on the road and I said to him, “I have to leave. But let me take this picture. That’s what I have.

Dan Nanamkin is from the Confederated Colville Tribes of Washington State. Every day he showed up in full dress. He is one of the most prayerful and peaceful people. He sang all the time, and wherever people needed help, he was there. I didn’t ask him for this photo. I literally only had a few seconds to make two images of him, and this was one. His body language seems to say, “Why? Why?”

This road we stood on was the real way Sacagawea LEDs Lewis and Clarke along the westward expedition in the early 1800s as part of their mission to explore and map the newly acquired territory of Louisiana.

Residents of Standing Rock created a blockade on this road, on the other side of which was a massive force with batons, tear gas, rubber bullets and sonic cannons. All of this was used against peaceful people, to defend the oil. Black smoke is from someone burning tires as part of the roadblock.

This first demonstration was during the Obama administration, and finally Obama said, “OK, no pipeline.” When Trump was elected, the first thing he did was sign an order for the pipeline to be completed. He ordered a much larger force of National Guard and law enforcement to dismantle the protest, and the pipeline continued.

Many protesters went to jail; many have endured incredible hardships. The tribe has always fought this pipeline in court, and now they are waiting and hoping for Biden to shut it down. The most recent update is that they found out the pipeline was built illegally, because the company didn’t do the full environmental assessments, now what? That’s where they are.

My job as a photographer is to show people something they may not have seen before, or to show something in a new way, to create more empathy and compassion and to expand the knowledge that the people of our world have. All in all, I think humans don’t deserve this planet. We don’t act like we deserve it. I know there will be a future – I don’t know if it will be a beautiful one.

There’s a saying from Oaxaca: “You crushed us into the ground, but you didn’t know we were seeds.” After Standing Rock, there is no pipeline without protest. It was an amazing experience to document.

Camille MarineBooks by include The Big Cloud and Melting Away, published by Princeton Architectural Press.

Camilla Marine. Photography: Tala Powis Parker

Resume of Camille Marin

Born: Long Island, New York, 1969.
Qualified: Studied photography with Jan Groover and John Cohen at Purchase College, State University of New York.
Affecting : Edward Burtynsky, Teru Kuwayama.
High point: “An exhibit in a museum at the University of Delaware where my belongings filled the whole hall of the museum, and in a little antechamber to the side were little pictures of Herbert Ponting, Frank Hurley, and all the white men who had photographed the polar regions. It was like I had left a mark that was part of this record now, and that was a woman.
Low point: “I almost died of dengue fever in Fiji.
Trick : “Spend time finding the way you see, and don’t try to copy the work of other photographers.

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‘It’s your only option’ | Local News https://1cplusplusstreet.com/its-your-only-option-local-news/ Mon, 02 May 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/its-your-only-option-local-news/ “The only way out is with new lungs.” That’s what Andy Wilkins and his wife Michelle learned after Andy was hospitalized with COVID-19. After testing positive on Aug. 1, Wilkins felt himself going downhill quickly. He and Michelle were on a getaway with friends when he started feeling unwell. He contacted his hometown primary care […]]]>

“The only way out is with new lungs.”

That’s what Andy Wilkins and his wife Michelle learned after Andy was hospitalized with COVID-19.

After testing positive on Aug. 1, Wilkins felt himself going downhill quickly. He and Michelle were on a getaway with friends when he started feeling unwell. He contacted his hometown primary care physician in Elizabethtown, who advised him to get tested for coronavirus.

“I started with shortness of breath and my oxygen level was dropping into the eighties,” Wilkins said. “It seemed like no time after receiving my positive test result that I was heading to the hospital. It all happened so fast.”

Over the next few days, Wilkins made two trips to the emergency room. He was admitted to Baptist Health Hardin in Elizabethtown on August 6. On August 26, he was at Norton Hospital in Louisville, on a ventilator and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), a heart-lung machine that pumps oxygenated blood through the body. . It allows the lungs to rest while removing carbon dioxide and returning oxygen-filled blood to the body, which helps improve tissue oxygenation.

The machine is used as a last resort for patients with severe respiratory failure due to COVID-19; some patients on ECMO stay there long enough for their lungs to recover. However, others, like Wilkins, are unable to recover due to extensive fibrosis, and ECMO is used to support them as a bridge while they are evaluated and considered for a lung transplant.

Wilkins recalls the conversation about a double lung transplant starting early in her hospital stay. Her pulmonologist at Norton, Dr. Sonia Compton, told her a transplant was her only option.

“Once I got hit by it, it just scared me,” he said. “You don’t know what to expect. All these “what if” scenarios started playing in my mind. »

On the ventilator, Wilkins couldn’t ask Compton any of the thousands of questions that crossed his mind. So he typed them on his iPad.

“What are the odds of getting to a place where you can live a long and healthy life as if nothing had happened,” he wrote. “What are the potential complications? Without a sugar coating, what is my best possible result? What is the timeline? »

But Wilkins’ main concern was for his wife and daughters, then aged 15 and 7.

“I just want to get home as fast as possible,” he wrote to Compton. “You don’t realize how many things you take for granted in life until something like this hits you like a brick wall. I don’t know what else to say I want to go home. I miss my girls like crazy.

Once Wilkins and Michelle made the decision to do the double lung transplant, he was transferred to UK HealthCare Chandler Hospital under the care of Dr Sravanthi Nandavaram, Medical Director of the UK Transplant Center Lung Transplant Programme.

On October 19, Wilkins underwent the double lung transplant surgery by Dr. Suresh Keshavamurthy, Surgical Director of the Lung Transplant Program. It was a long and technically difficult surgery, during which the EMCO and the tracheostomy were removed.

Twelve hours after his operation, he was taken off the ventilator and only has a nasal cannula left for supplemental oxygen. Wilkins took his first breath with his new lungs.

“I have never in my life faced anxiety,” he said. “But the anxiety kind of took hold of me and it took a lot of reassurances from Dr Nandavaram and the staff. They said, hey, you’ve got these brand new lungs and they’re working. You need to trust them. But I didn’t at first. It was something I didn’t know how to trust, or what to lean on.

“It was a pretty incredible feeling,” he continued. “Once I realized I could breathe, the feeling is kind of overwhelming. It just overwhelms you, as if to say, we’re doing it, we’re alone. It’s pretty amazing.

On November 5, after spending four months in three hospitals, Wilkins returned home. While his wife, Michelle, was with him throughout his stay and his eldest daughter was only able to visit him a few times, Andy had not seen his 7-year-old daughter in over three months.

“That was the hardest part,” he said. “We thought it would be too much for our youngest to see me like this. Throughout it all, not seeing the kids was the hardest part.

Seven months after his transplant, Wilkins is back to work full time. He runs a house building business and the job is not waiting for anyone.

“Dr. (Michael) Anstead told me during my check-up, don’t worry about going back to work so early, you have to take it easy. But I like to keep busy and sitting still isn’t enough for us. So I went back to full-time work about six weeks after the transplant,” he said.

Wilkins thanks Anstead, Nandavaram, Keshavamurthy and his entire care team, including Lung Transplant Advanced Practice Registered Nurses, Lung Transplant Coordinators and his team of physiotherapists for his speedy and remarkable recovery. He continues to see his healthcare team for monthly follow-up appointments.

“Dr. Nandavaram is just exceptional,” he said. “You can see her heart touching things and how much everyone respects and follows her.

“Dr. Nandavaram’s leadership skills are second to none,” he added. “You can see that shine through with all of his staff. You are not just a name on a piece of paper. It’s personal Her personal dedication to her patients is absolutely incredible.

While in Lexington for routine follow-up exams, Wilkins had the chance to visit the Kentucky Research Alliance for Lung Disease, where donated diseased lung tissue is stored. Wilkins donated his old lungs to the biobank where researcher Dr. Jamie Sturgill studies lungs donated by lung transplant patients.

There, floating in the preservative liquid in a specimen cup, is a small piece of Wilkins’ lung. He holds it at eye level as Sturgill explains the degree of scarring in his lung.

No matter how much oxygen they injected into him, Sturgill said, there was no way it could get through his lungs and the rest of his body. There was just too much damage.

The visual impact is powerful, for both Andy and Michelle. There really was no choice but the transplant.

National Gift of Life Month, a month-long celebration to raise awareness about donation, encourage Americans to register as organ, eye, and tissue donors, and honor those who have saved lives through to the donation, just ended. Wilkins has been on the registry for years, but he never really thought about what it meant to be an organ donor until his experience.

“I signed up years ago and never thought twice about it,” he said. “But going through it puts him in a whole new light.”

So what would he say to someone thinking of joining the registry?

“You can give life to so many people,” he said. “The end of a life doesn’t have to be the end. There is so much good that can come from being a giver. So many lives saved, so many second chances given. What do you have to lose?”

More than 1,000 Kentucky residents are waiting to receive hearts, livers, lungs, kidneys and other vital organs. Organ donors offer recipients a second chance at life, but the need for donations far outweighs the number available. Go to registermeky.org for more information and to register.

The COVID-19 vaccine is free and widely available. Go to vaccines.gov/search or text your postal code to GETVAX – 438829 – to find vaccination centers near you.

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