Computer Programming – 1C Plus Plus Street http://1cplusplusstreet.com/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 21:06:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Computer Programming – 1C Plus Plus Street http://1cplusplusstreet.com/ 32 32 India AI market forecast to reach $ 7.8 billion by 2025 – OpenGov Asia https://1cplusplusstreet.com/india-ai-market-forecast-to-reach-7-8-billion-by-2025-opengov-asia/ https://1cplusplusstreet.com/india-ai-market-forecast-to-reach-7-8-billion-by-2025-opengov-asia/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 21:06:20 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/india-ai-market-forecast-to-reach-7-8-billion-by-2025-opengov-asia/ The Ohio Criminal Sentencing Commission is job with the University of Cincinnati to build the Ohio Sentencing Data Platform (OSDP). The OSDP is designed to help judges implement uniform sentence entries and sentencing method and to provide courts with accessible and reliable information. The OFSP will achieve the following objectives: use data to inform decision […]]]>

The Ohio Criminal Sentencing Commission is job with the University of Cincinnati to build the Ohio Sentencing Data Platform (OSDP). The OSDP is designed to help judges implement uniform sentence entries and sentencing method and to provide courts with accessible and reliable information. The OFSP will achieve the following objectives: use data to inform decision making; improve transparency; and make the data accessible to the public, practitioners and research.

Collecting sentencing data into a comprehensive and searchable database will inform decision-making and provide judges with the tools and information necessary to impose sentences in accordance with the goals and principles of sentencing..

Courts, counties, and policymakers statewide can use this data to make smart and cost-effective decisions, promote smart and efficient use of resources, and ensure measured proportional responses. In addition, the use of data creates an opportunity to monitor and evaluate the results of these changes, determine whether desired effects are being achieved, and assess unintended consequences.

The OSDP will establish standardized data formats for compiling and tracking felony convictions in all 88 counties in Ohio. Built with $ 800,000 in court funding, the database will allow users to compare sentences across the state and view the broader demographics of those convicted to identify inconsistencies based on race or income. , for example.

Those of us who have been given the duty to lead and participate in the criminal justice system have an obligation to ensure that the public has confidence in this system and that the system works. Diversified justice for all. And data collection will make that happen.

– Maureen O’Connor, Chief Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court

So far, 34 of the state’s 244 common plea judges have opted for the program, requiring them to fill out detailed forms about their sentences. More and more judges are registering every week. The platform is the first step in providing accessible and searchable information to judges making sentencing decisions and increasing transparency and accessibility for the public, journalists and researchers.

Giving practitioners of the justice system, including judges, lawyers and court staff, the best available information to use during the sentencing process without administrative or tax burdens, enables them to exercise their public service functions. the most efficient way.

Until recently, Ohio did not have a central sentencing index, so it was difficult to find the number of people convicted of a specific crime in any given year, the sentences imposed for each offender, how many were imposed as a result of plea bargaining or how many offenders were placed under community supervision.

The Data-Driven OSDP Project is Designed to ‘Tell the Story’ of Sentencing in Ohio by Providing Understanding and Analysis of the Criminal Justice System by Providing State-Wide Information , reliable and accessible on the results of sentences.

As OpenGov Asia reports, the judiciary, banks and private companies use algorithms to make decisions that have a profound impact on people’s lives. Unfortunately, these algorithms are sometimes flawed – disproportionately affecting people of color as well as people from lower income classes when applying for loans or jobs, or even when courts decide what bond should be set while a no one is awaiting trial.

US researchers have developed a new artificial intelligence (AI) programming language that can assess the fairness of algorithms more accurately and faster than available alternatives. Their Sum-Product Probabilistic Language (SPPL) is a probabilistic programming system.

SPPL shows that exact probabilistic inference is practical, and not only theoretically possible, for a large class of probabilistic programs. The researchers applied SPPL to probabilistic programs drawn from real-world databases, to quantify the probability of rare events, generate synthetic proxy data based on constraints, and automatically filter the data for probable anomalies.


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Why proficiency exams are important and why the CWRU should tell students about them – The Observer https://1cplusplusstreet.com/why-proficiency-exams-are-important-and-why-the-cwru-should-tell-students-about-them-the-observer/ https://1cplusplusstreet.com/why-proficiency-exams-are-important-and-why-the-cwru-should-tell-students-about-them-the-observer/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 13:09:53 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/why-proficiency-exams-are-important-and-why-the-cwru-should-tell-students-about-them-the-observer/ With Case Western Reserve University’s huge Class of 2025 (1,600 people) filling freshman dorms and even most of Clarke Tower, classes are noticeably crowded. For example, MATH 121: Calculus for Science and Engineering I has a mind-boggling 512 occupied seats, enough to completely fill the Strosacker Auditorium. Fortunately, there is a way for freshmen to […]]]>

With Case Western Reserve University’s huge Class of 2025 (1,600 people) filling freshman dorms and even most of Clarke Tower, classes are noticeably crowded. For example, MATH 121: Calculus for Science and Engineering I has a mind-boggling 512 occupied seats, enough to completely fill the Strosacker Auditorium.

Fortunately, there is a way for freshmen to avoid these massive classes; they can use the credits earned on the high school’s advanced level (AP) tests to pass outside of them. And, best of all, if a student did not quite pass an AP exam or failed to pass it, they can take a proficiency exam instead.

Proficiency exams are fairly straightforward. Right before a course starts, you can take what is essentially the final exam, and if you pass, you don’t have to take the course. They can be beneficial for students who are confident in their abilities in math, physics, chemistry, or computer science.

However, there is a problem with the aptitude tests, which is that they only take place once per semester. If you miss the test date or didn’t know it, then, well, you’re out of luck and you have to take a course which may just be a review. It’s frustrating to hear from people who didn’t know that competency exams existed until it was too late.

Consider for a moment how many CWRU students took AP Calculus or Physics in high school, only to have to devote their precious time and classes to relearning the same subject. This time could be better used to take advanced courses earlier, thus lightening the course load for students in their later years. Not to mention that the administration of courses covering known material is an unnecessary drain on faculty, teaching assistants (TAs) and university resources. To put it simply, it is not in the best interest of the students, faculty, or administration of the CWRU that students repeat these courses.

Following this logic, the CWRU should require its students to take as many proficiency exams as possible. Even if a student cannot exit a course, it may be worth taking the exam to get an overview of the courses for the year. Despite the fall proficiency exams that take place during Discover Week, the logistics of these tests, including time and location, were only mentioned in the week’s schedule. In addition, several were in direct conflict with the orientation sessions, giving the impression that the exams are much less important than these sessions, although I would say the opposite.

Now, I’m not saying Discover Week should push proficiency exams down the throats of every incoming student. I have even spoken to students in the upper class who have expressed concerns that proficiency exams are dangerous as they can lead to people having difficulty in future lessons if they have a poor understanding of the material. prior. It may also be useful for students to take these courses again, either to integrate more easily into university life or to improve their familiarity with the subject. corresponding AP test.

It is therefore clear that this calls for common ground. I propose that in the future, CWRU’s Discovery Week itinerary highlights the proficiency exams at some point in time, not only to promote them, but also to educate students about the potential risks of exiting. a class whose content they do not fully master. There is much to be gained and little to be lost in educating students about their ability to pass prerequisite courses with proficiency exams.

Finally, if you are a first year, this is my call to action. If you are planning to take a course for which you have taken the AP equivalent (for example, PHYS 121: General Physics I – Mechanics or ENGR 131: Elementary Computer Programming), it is not too late to take a proficiency exam. They will likely take place in early January, and depending on the exam, you may need to pre-register. If you’re curious and want to either get out of a course, get a good start, or take a look at the material, go ahead and search for the proficiency exam for the course you plan to take.


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School board recognizes 2022 teacher of the year Bill McDonough https://1cplusplusstreet.com/school-board-recognizes-2022-teacher-of-the-year-bill-mcdonough/ https://1cplusplusstreet.com/school-board-recognizes-2022-teacher-of-the-year-bill-mcdonough/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 03:46:56 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/school-board-recognizes-2022-teacher-of-the-year-bill-mcdonough/ MONROE, CT – A Masuk High School graduate, now studying computer science at the University of Massachusetts, says she owes everything to her former teacher, William “Bill” McDonough, Monroe’s 2022 Teacher of the Year. In her appointment of McDonough, the student recalled her first day in her computer class at Masuk, looking around the class […]]]>

MONROE, CT – A Masuk High School graduate, now studying computer science at the University of Massachusetts, says she owes everything to her former teacher, William “Bill” McDonough, Monroe’s 2022 Teacher of the Year.

In her appointment of McDonough, the student recalled her first day in her computer class at Masuk, looking around the class thinking, “It’s really not my thing. They’re all boys. I will feel left out. I have to drop this class.

She asked her advisor to drop the class, but McDonough then told her to give it a chance.

“Looking back, I’m so glad I did, because I would have missed a lot if I hadn’t,” she said. “With his support and constant motivation, not only was there a spark of interest in the IT field, but I gained a lot of self-confidence working in a predominantly male field. “

Superintendent of Schools Joseph Kobza shared this story while recognizing McDonough as Teacher of the Year at Monday night’s Board of Education meeting. It was an illustration of the positive ways McDonough touches the lives of his students.

“It is a pleasure for me to introduce Bill as we recognize him as our Teacher of the Year 2022,” Kobza said.

McDonough’s teaching career began as a math teacher at Masuk in 1993. Then, around 2005, he started working in Masuk’s career and technology education department as a computer science teacher. .

Kobza said McDonough “largely started our computer science program,” having written the syllabus for all of Masuk’s computer science courses, including computer science, programming, engineering, robotics, and games. , and two advanced placement courses.

“Bill complements and manages the Perkins grant each year for us, helping us use the funds to purchase advanced equipment for the entire CTE department,” Kobza said. “He is the current past president and treasurer of the Connecticut Technology Engineering Educators Association.”

“He also created Masuk’s VEX Robotics team about a decade ago and had made them one of the best clubs, not only in Masuk, but in the entire state, region and country,” said Kobza. “As one parent mentioned in his nomination, ‘when Masuk comes to a competition all the schools start to think that the best team has arrived.’”

Masuk’s robotics team currently has 102 students, who meet “most of the year” with three two-hour working sessions per week and eight to 12 competitions per year, followed by state, regional and national events at the end of the year, according to Kobza. .

“We are very happy to recognize Bill tonight,” he said.

State recognition

State Representative Tony Scott, R-Monroe, left, presents a citation to 2022 Teacher of the Year William “Bill” McDonough at the Board of Education meeting on Monday night.

State Representative Tony Scott, R-112th, presented a citation to McDonough on behalf of the Connecticut General Assembly, himself and Senators Kevin Kelly, R-21st, and Marilyn Moore, D-22nd.

“Congratulations on your teacher of the year award,” Scott said. “While my kids are in seventh grade at Jockey Hollow, I can’t wait for them to experience being part of the robotics team or having you as a teacher in the next few years.”

“We couldn’t be prouder,” President Donna Lane told McDonough. “You represent Monroe very well and we are grateful to have you on board and to be part of our team here.”


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National | Learn to code https://1cplusplusstreet.com/national-learn-to-code/ https://1cplusplusstreet.com/national-learn-to-code/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 19:44:22 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/national-learn-to-code/ Ryerson University’s new Lincoln Alexander Law School trains future lawyers in the language of technology. Each of its more than 300 first and second year law students learn coding, design thinking, product development and entrepreneurship through four compulsory legal technology courses. The goal is to train the next generation of lawyers to master technology and […]]]>

Ryerson University’s new Lincoln Alexander Law School trains future lawyers in the language of technology. Each of its more than 300 first and second year law students learn coding, design thinking, product development and entrepreneurship through four compulsory legal technology courses. The goal is to train the next generation of lawyers to master technology and put them at ease with the changes taking place in the legal profession.

It’s an ambitious plan, but one that is part of a changing landscape in education to prepare law students for the future of law.

The concept of teaching technology to law students began at the very beginning of law school in 2017. “We discussed what is unique about Ryerson and how we are going to address underrepresented needs,” explains Associate Professor Sari Graben, also Associate Dean. for research and graduate studies. “We knew law and technology would be one of the things we would tackle.”

The first-year innovation course and three other second-year courses are designed as “building blocks” for students to learn the language of technology.

The first course, first taught last year, aims to introduce students to conceptual thinking, data analysis, and building prototypes. The real work begins in the second year. Students enter uncharted territory through an intensive week-long coding seminar focused on learning Python, a popular computer programming language.

Kendrick Lo is the perfect guide. As an intellectual property lawyer with an engineering background, Lo is a bridge between two worlds. He teaches a crash course in coding and another on data, code and social innovation. Its objective is to teach its students to develop an initiation to good data.

“They need basic knowledge,” says Lo, also head of innovation and analysis initiatives at Lincoln Alexander School of Law. “Machine learning and artificial intelligence have had a huge impact on all industries. It is advantageous for our students to deepen the concepts, to go beyond the knowledge of Wikipedia. You need to understand the performance of algorithms and how data is fed into these programs. This is where programming comes in handy. Without playing with data and programming, it’s hard to develop that intuition as to what good data is and what is missing. “

Once they have acquired this basic knowledge of code, students learn about data analysis, algorithmic biases, and information governance. The Synthesis Course on Access to Justice Solutions focuses on projects that would help alleviate access to justice issues. It will be taught in the winter term. Students will use complex data sets that highlight different user groups (FIX). From there, students examine privacy and cybersecurity issues and determine what legal advice a client needs.

At the start of the school year, students were asked to rank their level of coding comprehension. The average score out of 10 was 3. After completing the coding course, the average score increased to 6..

Canada has a few pioneers in teaching the code to law students. Jason Morris started doing this in 2019 at the University of Alberta Law School while completing his LLM. in computer law. Her course focuses on teaching law students to create programs using Docassemble.

“I don’t expect law students to be experts after I finish my course,” Morris says. “The point is to force yourself to go through the process to learn something new and how you can bring automated products into legal practice.”

Morris chose Docassemble because it is free and open source software. Jonathan Pyle, lawyer at Philadelphia Legal Assistance, designed the software as an easy-to-use tool that allows users to automate document assembly. Users enter data that creates documents based on the needs of programmers. Morris wants his students to see what is possible.

“No one was telling accountants they had to learn to code because they had the tools they needed,” Morris explains. “Our legal technology tools have not caught up with our needs.”

Her inspiration for her course came from Katie Sykes, who began her 21st Century Lawyer course in 2017 at Thompson Rivers University Law School. It has partnered with Neota Logic, a document automation software company.

Docassemble and Neota Logic are part of the growing movement of codeless software. Codeless software is designed to allow users to create programs without having to learn computer languages. Codeless programs are an attractive option for organizations that do not have the resources to create programs from scratch.

“As institutions, we are unwittingly giving them a narrow view of their options,” says Sykes, associate professor in the Faculty of Law at Thompson Rivers University. “You work for a large firm and have become a partner. But that’s not the only option. Doing something different, like opening your own law firm and only offering unbundled legal services is a valid option. They can use their skills not only in technology, but also to be creative in other ways. It’s about giving yourself permission to think differently.

If law students use software without code, are they still learning to code?

“For me, coding is expressing something in language that is strict enough that it can be executed reliably by a machine,” Morris explains. “By this definition, all these low-code / no-code tools are really just low-typing / no-typing. It’s all coding, just easier. But “difficult” has never been part of the definition, let alone a virtue. “

“We don’t do any coding in the sense of writing a computer language,” says Sykes. “Jason takes a broad definition of what coding is, and we do coding in that broader sense. My course is not primarily a technology course. It’s about giving students different tools to think about themselves. differently and allow them to chart their own path in law. “

Thompson Rivers University students are expected to create a prototype by the end of the course. One of Sykes’ favorite projects is a 2018 mobile app designed to help consumers file complaints against phone companies. One of Sykes’ students was an employee of a telephone company and knew how difficult it was for consumers to dispute incorrect charges on their phone bills.

The idea is simple. A user downloads their phone bill and the app calculates whether the user has been overcharged based on the phone plan, device used, etc. If the user has not been overcharged, the app sends them to a resource list for help. If the user has been overcharged, the app uses a series of interview style questions to enter the data. The application creates a complaint in PDF format and sends it to the applicable regulator based on the responses. The real game changer is how the app had pre-written answers that users could choose from. This ensured that the information was in the right order and easy for regulators to follow to process.

The problem is, the app doesn’t exist. None of the applications or projects created by law students at Lincoln Alexander School of Law, University of Alberta, or Thompson Rivers University reached the public because law schools did not. not the infrastructure to market these programs. In Morris’s course, a group of students created an app, Clear Justice, to streamline complaints against the police and one of the former students, Denis Ram, decided to go ahead and put the application in the market.

But this story is the exception. The idea is not to get students to bring products to market, even if they are asked to build something that could have a significant impact on access to justice. The resources to prepare these applications for commercialization are simply not available. And the infrastructure is lacking.

“My dream is to have an applications lab to be a permanent home for these projects,” says Sykes. “We have great prototypes, but we need at least six months of work to get them to market. Some students are motivated to work longer on these projects, but then they graduate and I’m busy, so that doesn’t happen. We need to create a center or a laboratory where we can deliver them. You need maintenance, updating and debugging. Students could work there as an independent project to get credit and have a summer job there as a clinic. We need something like this. “

Julie Sobowale is a journalist who covers law and technology.


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Devon Michael Chance | Obituary https://1cplusplusstreet.com/devon-michael-chance-obituary/ https://1cplusplusstreet.com/devon-michael-chance-obituary/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 05:56:42 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/devon-michael-chance-obituary/ Devon Michael Chance, 29, of Maceo, passed away on Friday October 1, 2021. He was born on August 1, 1992 in Owensboro to Michael Chance and Kimberly A. Knight Chance. Devon graduated from high school in 2010 and had many interests. He had recently made the decision to go back to school to begin a […]]]>

Devon Michael Chance, 29, of Maceo, passed away on Friday October 1, 2021. He was born on August 1, 1992 in Owensboro to Michael Chance and Kimberly A. Knight Chance. Devon graduated from high school in 2010 and had many interests. He had recently made the decision to go back to school to begin a degree in computer programming. He enjoyed playing video games, especially Dance Dance Revolution, and building or reprogramming computers. Devon also loved his family and animals and used his skills to work in construction. He leaves behind his dog, Bella.

Devon was predeceased by his great-grandmother, Betty Payne.

He is survived by his mother, Kimberly Chance; Father Michael (Jennifer) Chance; Sister Havana Watkins; stepfather Chad Watkins; grandmothers Linda (Al) Yager, Linda Cheek, Amy Bell and Cynthia Aldridge; half-brothers Logan Morton (Ashlee Ward) and Evan Burks; half-siblings Angel Vowels, Jarede Chance, Alexis Chance and Jacob Chance; and nephews Amari Morton and Kahrim Morton.

The service will be held Friday at 6 p.m. at the Glenn Funeral and Crematorium, where visitation will begin at 4 p.m.

Memories and condolences can be left with the family while visiting www.glenncares.com.


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10 best quantum cryptography books of all time https://1cplusplusstreet.com/10-best-quantum-cryptography-books-of-all-time/ https://1cplusplusstreet.com/10-best-quantum-cryptography-books-of-all-time/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 17:35:04 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/10-best-quantum-cryptography-books-of-all-time/ by Madhurjya Chowdhury October 5, 2021 Quantum cryptography is a branch of research that uses the principles of quantum mechanics to encrypt and transmit data, making it impossible for hackers, even those with quantum computing capabilities, to access it. The development and execution of different cryptographic tasks using the advanced skills and power of quantum […]]]>

by Madhurjya Chowdhury
October 5, 2021

Quantum cryptography is a branch of research that uses the principles of quantum mechanics to encrypt and transmit data, making it impossible for hackers, even those with quantum computing capabilities, to access it. The development and execution of different cryptographic tasks using the advanced skills and power of quantum computers are also included in the wider use of quantum cryptography. Quantum computers have the potential to help create new, stronger and more precise encryption methods that would be difficult to create with today’s computing and communications infrastructures.

Here are the 10 best quantum cryptography books you can read to learn more about the concept.

# 1. Generation of quantum random numbers

This book provides an overview of current solutions of the Quantum Random Number Generator (QRNG), emphasizing their relationship to classical concepts of statistical randomness and numerical methods of calculating random numbers. The reader, who should preferably have a background in probability and statistics, computer programming or cryptography, will be guided step by step in the field of quantum bits, with clear relationships between QRNGs and their classical equivalents established along the line. line.

# 2. The 2020-2025 Global Outlook for Quantum Cryptography

This report examines the global outlook for quantum cryptography in more than 190 countries. The latent market figures, or Industry Potential Gains (PIEs), for the country in question (in millions of US dollars), as well as the country’s market share as a percentage of the area and the world, are given for each year presented. These benchmarks allow the reader to quickly assess the position of a country in relation to others. Estimates of implicit demand are calculated using econometric models that project basic economic processes within and between countries.

This study does not go into detail on the individual market players who meet latent demand, nor on the specifics of specific products.

# 3. Quantum cryptography

The United States Air Force is expected to learn more about quantum physics and its application to encryption, according to this research. Quantum encryption is inevitable, according to a study of scientists and academic organizations undertaking research to better understand and use quantum cryptography. The attempt to learn and use this information must be made with the full understanding that quantum cryptography is not a split down the road that requires a choice, but rather a technical necessity.

# 4. Applied quantum cryptography

This is a brand new technology that uses the quantum characteristics of single photons to transfer binary keys between two parties for future encryption of secret data. A few years ago, quantum cryptography, or more precisely the distribution of quantum keys, was the domain of university basic research facilities. However, things have changed in recent years. Quantum Key Distribution, or QKD, left the lab and was picked up by more pragmatic teams who worked hard to create viable technology from the amazing discoveries of basic research.

# 5. Quantum computing for high school students

Peter Shor devised a quantum algorithm in 1994 that, once large-scale quantum computers were built, would break much of the cryptography used in digital communications. Quantum computers are devices that use quantum systems as processors and operate on the principles of quantum mechanics. This book only uses college algebra and trigonometry to explore the fascinating subject of quantum computing. The basis of quantum computing theory is based on concepts from quantum physics, mathematics, computing, and cryptography. One of the goals of this book is to understand Shor’s algorithm.

# 6. Post-quantum cryptography

This book contains the refereed results of the 8th International Workshop on Post-Quantum Cryptography, PQCrypto 2017, which took place in June 2017 in Utrecht, the Netherlands. Out of a total of 67 submissions, the 23 complete revised papers delivered were carefully assessed and selected. Code-based cryptography, quantum algorithms, network-based cryptography, isogeny-based cryptography, multivariate cryptography, and security models are among the topics covered in the articles.

# 7. Introduction to quantum information science

The fundamentals of quantum theory, quantum entanglement, quantum algorithms, quantum entropies, quantum error correction, quantum coding, and quantum cryptography are all covered in this book. The only prerequisites are a basic understanding of calculus and linear algebra. Undergraduates will be able to understand the text this way. To understand quantum information, one must first learn the basics of quantum theory. This book presents it from a more operational point of view, which is appropriate for quantum information, but not standard quantum theory textbooks.

# 8. A New Mechanism to Boost Security in Quantum Cryptography

Today, the main issue is security. Quantum cryptography is a data transfer technology that uses polarization. The study described here proposes a technique that improves the security of data when it is sent. The BB84 protocol serves as the basis for this mechanism. From sender to receiver and from receiver to sender, this protocol is used. The key you get after using the method is pretty safe.

# 9. Physical layer security and quantum key distribution

To meet the highest security controls, this manual incorporates the most advanced topics of physical layer security, covert / stealth communications, cryptography, quantum key distribution (QKD), and cybersecurity. After presenting several concepts and practices to the reader, the author explains how they can be used together to solve problems rather than being treated as separate disciplines.

#ten. Nonlinear laser dynamics

The nonlinear dynamic observations of semiconductor lasers are discussed in a unique way. The book integrates current findings in quantum dot laser modeling with mathematical details and analytical knowledge of nonlinear processes in semiconductor lasers, as well as potential laser applications in encryption and chaos management. This multidisciplinary approach sets it apart as a unique and valuable source of information for anyone interested in contributing to this field of study.

Conclusion

Quantum computers are developing rapidly, promising to provide strong computer skills capable of handling a wide range of crucial, even life-threatening computing problems that ordinary computers cannot. Unfortunately, quantum computers have the potential to generate new dangers at unprecedented speed and scale. Complex mathematical calculations, for example, that take months or years for normal computers to solve can be solved in seconds by quantum computers using quantum algorithms such as Shor’s algorithm. However, systems capable of deciphering classical math-based encryption methods are expected to appear within the next 5-10 years.

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Louisiana Ragin ‘Cajuns football take Sun Belt victory over southern Alabama https://1cplusplusstreet.com/louisiana-ragin-cajuns-football-take-sun-belt-victory-over-southern-alabama/ https://1cplusplusstreet.com/louisiana-ragin-cajuns-football-take-sun-belt-victory-over-southern-alabama/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 03:11:15 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/louisiana-ragin-cajuns-football-take-sun-belt-victory-over-southern-alabama/ MOBILE, Alabama – UL relied heavily on their running game in the rain before coming off with a 20-18 win at Southern Alabama Saturday night at Hancock Whitney Stadium. UL only won after a failed 37-yard field goal attempt in southern Alabama with 59 seconds left. Emani bailey and Chris Smith made touchdowns in the […]]]>

MOBILE, Alabama – UL relied heavily on their running game in the rain before coming off with a 20-18 win at Southern Alabama Saturday night at Hancock Whitney Stadium.

UL only won after a failed 37-yard field goal attempt in southern Alabama with 59 seconds left.

Emani bailey and Chris Smith made touchdowns in the first half for The Ragin ‘Cajuns, as is quarterback Levi Lewis.

UL (4-1, 2-0 Sun Belt) rushed for 158 of his 198 total attacking yards in the first half. South Alabama (3-1, 0-1) was limited to 45 rushing yards in the first half on 18 attempts. Statistics were unofficial due to a malfunction in computer programming.

Down 20-6 at halftime, South Alabama made it a one-possession game with a 2-yard touchdown from Bryan Hill in the third quarter. The PAT did hit the amount though, making it 20-12. Jaguars quarterback Jake Bentley hit a 1-yard touchdown on the fourth and the goal early in the fourth, but Zi’Yon Hill sacked Bentley as Southern Alabama tried to match him.


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How a group strives to bridge the gaps https://1cplusplusstreet.com/how-a-group-strives-to-bridge-the-gaps/ https://1cplusplusstreet.com/how-a-group-strives-to-bridge-the-gaps/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 13:00:48 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/how-a-group-strives-to-bridge-the-gaps/ Max Chavez remembers when he finally found the coding error that caused his two-dimensional red and yellow ball to defy the laws of physics. He was watching the ball on an old Mac computer on a cafeteria table at the East Palo Alto Academy. That was in 2016, he was a freshman in high school […]]]>

Max Chavez remembers when he finally found the coding error that caused his two-dimensional red and yellow ball to defy the laws of physics.

He was watching the ball on an old Mac computer on a cafeteria table at the East Palo Alto Academy. That was in 2016, he was a freshman in high school and he had become a member of StreetCode Academy, a local nonprofit that provided free training for students to bridge the tech divide in Silicon Valley.

Instead of glancing at the wall, the bullet returned to its original path. A StreetCode professor had Chavez go through every line of his code until Chavez finally identified the culprit: a stray “-1”. He remembers the surge of excitement he felt – and its wider meaning.

“People who come from my community are not fortunate enough to have that spark,” Chavez said.

The following year, he himself became a StreetCode teacher. Now he is studying computer science at UC Berkeley. And StreetCode, which started out in a cafeteria, has moved to the Facebook campus.

Founded in 2016 with $ 1 million in seed funding from Chris Cox, product manager at Facebook, it has grown from around 20 students per year to around 2,000, mostly in East Palo Alto. The organization connects students from East Palo Alto, where the median income is $ 30,000 per year, with tech professionals, offers training in various areas of IT, and provides seed funding for student startups.

Although East Palo Alto is surrounded by the huge capital of Facebook, Google, and Stanford University, many of its residents have little access to the tools of the tech industry. “We have community members inside this environment who have no access, no computer, no mentor, no conception of what technology is,” said Olatunde Sobomehin, CEO and co-founder of StreetCode. “We are really in this desert, literally in the middle of the Amazon rainforest.”

StreetCode Academy Co-Founder / CEO Olatunde Sobomehin, left, leaves the stage after introducing Facebook Product Manager Chris Cox standing with a microphone at a StreetCode fundraising and celebration event at the Facebook headquarters on June 13, 2017, in Menlo Park. (Kevin Kelly / Daily News)

Chavez started playing with the code in college by watching tutorials online. “I was probably in the hack,” he smiles. “I have to learn somewhere.” But while the East Palo Alto Academy was located in the heart of the technology capital of the world, it did not have any computer classes, like the “Computer Programming 1-3” course available at Palo Alto Private High School, Merger at $ 20,000 per year. .

“What you see in Silicon Valley, more likely than any other place in the world, is you have extreme gaps in mindset, extreme gaps in skills, extreme gaps in access, ”Sobomehin said.

Chavez says this has serious consequences. He reported the problem of artificial intelligence facial recognition fails to decipher non-white faces. Just a few weeks ago, the The New York Times reported that Facebook’s artificial intelligence asked users watching a video that included black males if they wanted to see more primate videos. Facebook has apologized and is fixing the issue.

“People from different backgrounds matter,” said Chavez. “So things like the facial recognition incident don’t happen again.”

Recently, StreetCode has developed a new way to use non-fungible tokens, or NFTs, for its own fundraising. NFTs are unique digital copies of images, videos, or even Tweets that someone can purchase, like a Leonardo da Vinci painting that only exists behind a computer screen. After a chance online encounter at the behest of MC Hammer, StreetCode developed philanthropic NFTs, or pNFTs. StreetCode hopes the new approach will bring a small part of the 174 million dollars spent on DTV since 2017 back to nonprofits and StreetCode students like Brian Miller, a seventh grade student at Greene Middle School in Palo Alto.


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Arizona State University: ASU Center Celebrates 5 Years of Successful STEM Programming Initiatives https://1cplusplusstreet.com/arizona-state-university-asu-center-celebrates-5-years-of-successful-stem-programming-initiatives/ https://1cplusplusstreet.com/arizona-state-university-asu-center-celebrates-5-years-of-successful-stem-programming-initiatives/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 23:16:50 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/arizona-state-university-asu-center-celebrates-5-years-of-successful-stem-programming-initiatives/ October 1, 2021 The Center for Gender Equity in Science and Technology celebrates five successful years of programming initiatives at Arizona State University. Over the past five years, the center has worked with a wide range of students, parents, schools, and industry partners not only in Arizona but across the United States and abroad. The […]]]>

October 1, 2021

The Center for Gender Equity in Science and Technology celebrates five successful years of programming initiatives at Arizona State University. Over the past five years, the center has worked with a wide range of students, parents, schools, and industry partners not only in Arizona but across the United States and abroad.

The center is a one-of-a-kind research center that was founded in 2016 by Kimberly scott, Professor of ASU Women and Gender Studies and the creator of CompuGirls programming which has been in operation since 2007. The culturally relevant CompuGirls technology program is the foundation of the centre’s programming. With innovative programs like CompuPower, Cyber ​​Warriors and Girls in Tech, the center has proven time and time again that its impact is far reaching and its programs do their part to fill the STEM pipeline of historically underrepresented students.

During a presentation in 2016, a research assistant demonstrates how the programmable social robot works and how it is used to teach girls to code in CompuGirls programming. Photo courtesy of the Center for Gender Equity in Science and Technology
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What’s more, what the center does “is more than inspiring girls to pursue STEM, but really helps them feel more empowered to know themselves better, to know their cultural identity better, and to truly integrate their personal and professional identities. together, ”said Chun Tao, a current Stanford postdoctoral researcher and former graduate student researcher at the center.

In interviews with former ASU employees and partners for a series of testimonials to celebrate the fifth anniversary, it was clear that the mission and goals of the organization were what attracted each individual to work with the center and that these passions were what fueled the center. Over the past five years, the center has remained true to its mission “to actively promote the discourse and experiences of underrepresented girls in STEM by owning, generating and criticizing the scholarship package and offering culturally appropriate programs for girls of color. and STEM education. ”

Patricia Garcia, an assistant professor at the University of Michigan, was the first postdoctoral researcher hired at the center after completing her doctorate at UCLA. Asked about her attraction to the center, she said “this was the first time I saw an assets-based approach and really thought about what students of color, what skills and knowledge they already have and how we can actually do it. take advantage of these to open up avenues in STEM. ”

Gabriel Escontrias, the former director of the Center for Gender Equity in Science and Technology, said that “if you join the center, I think you join it for its mission.”

“It’s exciting the growth that I continue to see,” he said.

Escontrías left the center to run for the Arizona State Senate and continued to collaborate with the center over the years, including leading a workshop on Latin representation in STEM at the upcoming anniversary retreat for staff, students and associate professors.

Elisabeth wentz, the current dean of Graduate College; Ji Mi Choi, vice president at Knowledge Enterprise; and Patrick mcdermott, Director of Engagement at the Thunderbird School of Global Management, have all been part of the center in one capacity or another over the past five years.

“I have an incredible admiration for Kim, personally and professionally, for all she has accomplished and for the incredible impact she has had on so many young people as they have passed here at ASU and on the sites. CompuGirls, ”McDermott said.

CompuGirls Founder Kimberly A. Scott will be named the White House STEM Access Change Champion at an event on February 26 to honor those who work to support and accelerate STEM (science, technology, technology, STEM) opportunities. engineering and mathematics) for African American students, schools and communities.

Scott, associate professor of women and gender studies at Arizona State University’s School of Social Transformation, founded and directs CompuGirls. The program combines learning advanced computer skills with key areas of social justice to develop adolescent girls’ skills and interest in technology and computers.

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The girls are using technology as a tool in the program to address complex issues such as child abuse, loss of indigenous language and culture, and gentrification. Beginning in eighth grade, the girls participating come from underserved school districts and are predominantly Hispanic, African-American, and Native American.

“Being named the STEM Access Change Champion is not only a separate honor, but also a recognition of the need to teach girls tech skills in an engaging and transformative way,” said Scott. “Bringing girls from underserved communities into the digital world will ultimately add intellectual diversity and talent to our country’s workforce. ”

The Champions for Change program began in 2011 when President Barack Obama called for recognition of citizens doing extraordinary things at the local level. Champion of Change winners are chosen through a rigorous nomination and selection process.

Scott saw the need for a program to teach girls advanced technological skills in 2007 when she launched CompuGirls. At that time, only 10% of college girls considered the computer profession a “very good” choice for them, according to the National Science Foundation.

A new analysis of the test data, recently published in Education Week, found that no female student, African American or Hispanic had taken the Advanced Placement exam in computer science in Mississippi and Montana. Overall, of the 30,000 students who took the exam last year, less than 20 percent of those students were women.

A 2012 study by the National Center for Women and Information Technology found that African American and Hispanic women make up only 3% and 1% of the IT workforce in the United States. Native American women specializing in computer and information science represent less than 1%.

Part of the problem is that girls view programming or other tech careers as culturally irrelevant, and not as a tool to achieve their goals, Scott said. When engaged in social justice issues that are important to them, girls learn about technology as a way to build their projects.

By providing fun programs where participants learn the latest technology in digital media, game development and virtual worlds, girls learn skills such as digital media production with photo editing software, movie making documentaries, game design and simulations with Scratch and the creation of virtual worlds with open-sim technology.

Self-esteem is boosted through the program, as Mitzi Vilchis discovered when she overcame her fear of giving public presentations through the program.

“The culture at CompuGirls is really positive,” Vilchis said. “It was really a challenge, but we all felt really empowered about our subjects.”

CompuGirls has empowered her to tackle domestic violence and taught her technological skills that have given her confidence to help others when they have a problem with computers – something she never would have done before. Currently a first year student at ASU, Vilchis is preparing a diploma in secondary education and English.

Scott originally developed CompuGirls with support from the Arizona Community Foundation. Recently, the National Science Foundation made several large grants to deliver the program to girls in school districts in the Phoenix metro area, including the Gila River Boys & Girls Club in Sacaton and Komatke, Arizona, which is part of the community. Gila River Indian. . The program has since expanded to Colorado.

Scott is also co-lead of STEM For All, along with Kevin Clark of George Mason University, which brings together a diverse group of researchers, practitioners, funding agencies and policy analysts to work on the development of ” a forum where an interdisciplinary team shares knowledge and develops programs. and actions that lead to broadening understanding and pragmatic solutions for traditionally underserved students to enter and persist in STEM fields.

The School of Social Transformation is an academic unit of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at ASU.


This press release was produced by Arizona State University. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.


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Senior Digital Media Portfolios: Reaghan Lesh. https://1cplusplusstreet.com/senior-digital-media-portfolios-reaghan-lesh/ https://1cplusplusstreet.com/senior-digital-media-portfolios-reaghan-lesh/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 12:15:00 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/senior-digital-media-portfolios-reaghan-lesh/ Media by Yutong Nan. Media by Reaghan Leash. The University of Greenville prepares its students well to enter the workforce. GU’s digital media program does a great job of asking students to design a digital media portfolio in their senior year. Seniors can view a range of different media on the DM Portfolio website. This […]]]>

Media by Yutong Nan.

The University of Greenville prepares its students well to enter the workforce. GU’s digital media program does a great job of asking students to design a digital media portfolio in their senior year. Seniors can view a range of different media on the DM Portfolio website. This variety of media includes video, photography, graphic design, audio, programming, and more.

Media by Lauren Eagleson, edited by Frances Trujillo.

As indicated in the course description, GU believes that by following this course, students will be better prepared for entering the job market or doctoral school: “This course will give the student the opportunity to demonstrate his talent in the field of digital content. Each portfolio will include interactive design (including visual design, navigation and information), creative arts and various technical projects. The student will demonstrate the level of expertise acquired in digital media courses, such as graphic design, web design, computer programming, digital video, digital. Photography, Digital Multimedia and Studio Recording. This portfolio is intended to prepare students for entering the job market or for doctoral school.

By browsing the DM portfolio website, one can venture through semesters of student portfolios. There is a list of all seniors who have completed portfolios for a specific semester, with each individual’s portfolio website hyperlinked to their name. Once you click on a senior citizen’s name, you can browse their amazing artwork on a website created by the senior themselves.

Reaghan lesh, a current senior DM, said, “We build our websites through WordPress. This is the opportunity to make the website consistent with your work and your brand ”. Lesh is enrolled in the Digital Media Portfolio (DMDA 401) course this semester. She’s at the start of her portfolio. She will be working on her portfolio week after week, collecting and organizing her projects, and putting them together on the website. Each senior is required to have four categories of media in their portfolio. From now on, her collection will include photography, videography, graphic design and animation, consisting of work she has done in and out of school. Lesh has added content to her portfolio over the years by getting involved in things to use her digital media skills.

“What helped me prepare was getting involved in activities where I could use my digital media skills. I was on GSGA as Vice President of Media and Communications for two years, and I also did internships which helped me produce a lot of content for my portfolio, ”Lesh said.

As the semester ends, seniors will begin to advertise their portfolios on campus using posters and other forms of media. Reaghan Lesh, along with other digital media seniors in Greenville, will have the chance to show off their artwork and kick off their careers with a DM portfolio presentation later in the year.

Written by Desirae Yost, Adam Fike, Yutong Nan and Isaac Green.


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