Computer Programming – 1C Plus Plus Street http://1cplusplusstreet.com/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 15:46:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default.png Computer Programming – 1C Plus Plus Street http://1cplusplusstreet.com/ 32 32 How an Algorithm Solves Wordle https://1cplusplusstreet.com/how-an-algorithm-solves-wordle/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 15:33:29 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/how-an-algorithm-solves-wordle/ open share links close share links Everyone has an opinion on how to play wordle, the popular word guessing game. Start every game with AUDIO. Or maybe CRANE, or ARISE. Bill Gates shared his strategy. Thus has Kamala Harris. A new paper by MIT Professor SloanDimitris Bertsimasand Alex Paskov, a PhD student at MIT Sloan, […]]]>

Everyone has an opinion on how to play wordle, the popular word guessing game. Start every game with AUDIO. Or maybe CRANE, or ARISE. Bill Gates shared his strategy. Thus has Kamala Harris.

A new paper by MIT Professor Sloanand Alex Paskov, a PhD student at MIT Sloan, could settle the matter once and for all.

Using a modeling method known as exact dynamic programming, the researchers designed an algorithm that optimally solves the game without fail. In Wordle, players have six tries to guess a five-letter word. After entering a word, colored tiles indicate whether the letters are in the word and whether they are in the correct place. The model solves the game in just two guesses 4% of the time and in three guesses 57% of the time. He only needs a fifth guess 3% of the time, and he never relies on that sixth and final round.

What word does the computer start with? SALET – an obsolete form of salett, which is an “ornamentally engraved helmet”, according to Wiktionary. For audiophiles, Bertsimas and Paskov note that SALET reveals an average of 1,683 colored tiles on the first hit, while AUDIO reveals an average of 1,320 colored tiles. Other main words include REAST (a resting obsolete spelling), TRACE, CRATE, and SLATE.

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With SALET, the computer model averages one win in just 3,421 guesses. For comparison, Saint Paul, Minnesota, which has the highest average Wordle score of any city in the United States, comes to 3.51 guesses.

The algorithm reaches this score by opening the game with SALET. Based on the colored tiles revealed by this initial guess, it then determines all the possible guesses that could follow, from a list of 10,657 five-letter words. (Only 2,315 of these are possible answers, because Wordle limits the universe of solutions.) Finally, based on what is available, the algorithm chooses the next most strategically illuminating word.

Bertsimas and Paskov designed the algorithm to explain every move – in a sense, it teaches best practice by demonstrating its logic. (The website wordleopt.com allows users to see what the algorithm suggests based on SALET as the starting word.) As an example, they present a hypothetical case where someone starts with the word LIGHT. This guess reveals that IGHT are all the right letters in the right position.

To figure out what comes next, most people would start scrolling through the possibilities – TIGHT, FIGHT, MIGHT, RIGHT, and NIGHT, for example. Instead, the computer takes a second estimate of FERMS (Middle English form of “farms”) and, in one line, eliminates five possibilities at once.

For those who play Wordle, it might be helpful to take note of the algorithm’s approach, study a Scrabble dictionary, and brush up on your average English. But an easier first step is to start a game with SALET and see where it takes you.

Figure comparing the Wordle table resulting from a possible game played by a human and the optimal policy. Credit: Bertsimas, D. and Paskov, A., “An exact and interpretable solution for Wordle”, 2022.

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Ask Slashdot: What was your first computer? https://1cplusplusstreet.com/ask-slashdot-what-was-your-first-computer/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 00:41:51 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/ask-slashdot-what-was-your-first-computer/ Longtime Slashdot reader Destinyland writes: Today, the official GitHub Twitter account asked the ultimate question for geeks. “You never forget your first computer. What was yours? And within 10 hours, they had received 2,700 responses. Commodore 64, TRS-80, Atari 800, Compaq Presario… People have been posting names you haven’t heard in years, as if sharing […]]]>

Longtime Slashdot reader Destinyland writes: Today, the official GitHub Twitter account asked the ultimate question for geeks. “You never forget your first computer. What was yours?

And within 10 hours, they had received 2,700 responses.

Commodore 64, TRS-80, Atari 800, Compaq Presario… People have been posting names you haven’t heard in years, as if sharing memories of old friends. Gateway 2000, Sony VAIO, Vic-20, Packard Bell… One person just remembered having had “some kind of PC that had an orange and black screen with text and QBasic. It couldn’t do big -something more than storing recipes and playing text-based games.”

And other memories began to flow. (“Stuck on Commander Keen & The island of Dr. Brain…“Damn, that Doom game was amazing, I can’t forget Oregon Trail…”)

Sharp PC-4500, Toshiba T3200, Timex Sinclair 1000, NEC PC-8801. Another’s first computer was “A very, very old HP laptop with a broken battery!”

My first computer was an IBM PS/2. It had an internal 2400 baud modem. Although in the days before local internet services, it was only really good for connecting to BBSes. I played chess against a program on a floppy disk that I got from a guy at work.
Do you still remember yours? Share your best memories in the comments.

What was your first computer?

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Tech-based institution graduates eight times in Ekiti https://1cplusplusstreet.com/tech-based-institution-graduates-eight-times-in-ekiti/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 05:45:14 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/tech-based-institution-graduates-eight-times-in-ekiti/ Alluvium University, Ekiti State Center graduated its first batch of technical engineers and programmers. Graduates will work with the UK-based parent company, Alluvium International, in its provision of computer programming solutions for businesses and organizations across the world. Speaking at the eight graduate ceremony in Ado-Ekiti, the state capital, the university’s principal founder, Jaytee Ojo, […]]]>

Alluvium University, Ekiti State Center graduated its first batch of technical engineers and programmers.

Graduates will work with the UK-based parent company, Alluvium International, in its provision of computer programming solutions for businesses and organizations across the world.

Speaking at the eight graduate ceremony in Ado-Ekiti, the state capital, the university’s principal founder, Jaytee Ojo, noted that the training was necessary for graduates to access the global market for over $1 billion for remote technical engineers. and programmers.

He explained that organizations around the world, especially in Europe, lack software engineers, which they source from other continents, adding that graduates would be recruited and work in Nigeria and earn their financial rewards.

Ojo, Founder of the Jaytee Ojo Foundation, said, “Alluvium University is committed to training graduates to become skilled and valued professionals and to providing promising young Africans with opportunities to pursue careers in the technology industry by as engineers or consultants. “

Regarding the choice of Ekiti for the location of the university, the founder revealed that the decision was to achieve a balance between city life and the serenity of the countryside.

He revealed that the graduates selected from over 200 applicants had been exposed to the required education and skills with necessary material support running into the millions at no cost.

The faculty consultant, Mobolaji Tenibiaje, said the founders’ vision was necessitated by the shortage of Nigerian engineers and technology professionals in the global technology market.

While commending the Founder and his partner, Wale Olojo, for their commitment and dedication to providing global opportunities for young tech engineers, Tenibiaje pointed out that young citizens of the state will now have the opportunity to change their unemployment story. .

Some of the graduates praised the institution for giving them the opportunity to learn the skill at no cost, expressed their willingness to work to provide technological solutions to the problems facing humanity across the world.

Some of the graduates who spoke praised the institution for giving them the opportunity to learn and acquire skills at no cost, said they were ready to work to provide technological solutions to the problems facing humanity worldwide.

READ ALSO FROM NIGERIAN TRIBUNE

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From Seattle to Lafayette, Ohio https://1cplusplusstreet.com/from-seattle-to-lafayette-ohio/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 05:08:22 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/from-seattle-to-lafayette-ohio/ LAFAYETTE — In recent years, many people have left the West Coast states to settle in other parts of the country. In fact, it’s a changing demographic that seems pretty constant lately. These people are moving because home prices on the west coast, on a continuum, are getting practically astronomical. They are moving because crime […]]]>

LAFAYETTE — In recent years, many people have left the West Coast states to settle in other parts of the country. In fact, it’s a changing demographic that seems pretty constant lately.

These people are moving because home prices on the west coast, on a continuum, are getting practically astronomical. They are moving because crime rates on the West Coast, especially in metropolitan areas, also seem to be increasing exponentially as of late. And still others, in the countryside, move to get out in front of the next forest fire.

Aeriel and Steve Eyerly lived in the greater Seattle area. And Aeriel said, candidly, “Seattle isn’t all it takes to be.”

In addition, Steve does remote computer programming. So, like so many others these days, he could work from anywhere in the country.

Given this, the couple started looking elsewhere a few years ago.

Elsewhere, first, it was Idaho. Then it was, like, further east to states like South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa… And then it was: Toledo, Ohio – “Mud Hens,” and everything.

But just before they closed on a house in Toledo, another house (of sorts) popped up on the couple’s internet radar. Destination: Lafayette, Ohio.

To say the place in Lafayette was some sort of BIG structure would be a decided understatement. The two-story brick building had originally been Lafayette’s former Masonic Lodge. Then it was a grocery store, circa 1939. Then it was a thrift store/auction house.

And now it’s, well, just a house. A house that spans 3,600 square feet, over two floors. More than enough, in fact, for the couple’s eight children.

In true HGTV fashion, over the past two years they’ve been steadily fixing the place. Aeriel described the interior motif as “gothic/eclectic”. She said the paint was made up of lots of grays, blacks, purples… and skulls. She added that the theme of the place can be described as “Halloween all year round”.

When the Aeriels and Steve aren’t working on redecorating, they go to Allen East children’s sporting events, school band events, and a plethora of other kid-friendly events.

Aeriel and Steve said the village (pop. 387) has been very welcoming to them and they have gotten to know a number of neighbors over the past two years. While, okay, getting to know many of greater Seattle’s 4,102,400 neighbors might have been, oh, a little harder.

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UW-Madison climbs US News list, ranked 38th overall and 10th best audience https://1cplusplusstreet.com/uw-madison-climbs-us-news-list-ranked-38th-overall-and-10th-best-audience/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 14:56:12 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/uw-madison-climbs-us-news-list-ranked-38th-overall-and-10th-best-audience/ Bascom Hall is pictured in an aerial view of the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. Photo: Jeff Miller The University of Wisconsin-Madison was ranked 38th overall and 10th among public institutions (both tied) in US News & World Report 2022-23 Ranking of the best colleges. Last year, UW-Madison was ranked 42nd in a five-way tie and […]]]>

Bascom Hall is pictured in an aerial view of the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus. Photo: Jeff Miller

The University of Wisconsin-Madison was ranked 38th overall and 10th among public institutions (both tied) in US News & World Report 2022-23 Ranking of the best colleges.

Last year, UW-Madison was ranked 42nd in a five-way tie and 14th among public institutions.

The ranking, released today, includes 440 national graduate universities and is part of the 2022-2023 edition of America’s Best Colleges.

“As one of the best universities in the world, UW-Madison offers a high-quality education that provides lifelong value to our students,” said Chancellor Jennifer L. Mnookin. “While the rankings are just one measure of excellence, I’m thrilled to see so many areas of our success reflected.”

US News collects data from and about each school regarding undergraduate academic reputation, student excellence, faculty resources, expert opinion, financial resources, alumni donations, rates graduation and retention rates, graduate rate performance and social mobility. Each indicator is assigned a weighting based on US News’ judgments of the most important quality measures.

UW-Madison continues to do particularly well in terms of peer reputation and was ranked 28th overall and seventh among public institutions for the second year in a row.

The university also moved up in several categories, including 51st in financial resources, up from 52n/a last year, and 57e in student excellence, against 59e Last year.

UW–Madison continues to improve in faculty resources and was ranked 84e in total, up 107e Last year. The university has moved up 63 places in this ranking category over the past four years. The top-ranked institutions in this category are those with high faculty salaries and small class sizes, as well as highly qualified faculty and teaching staff.

“We know how valuable our faculty members are, which is why we have prioritized recruiting and retaining exceptional people to enhance our educational programs,” says John Karl Scholz, Provost and Vice Chancellor for Business academics. “This commitment, along with our extraordinary academic and academic staff, continues to strengthen the university’s standing in these rankings.”

The six factors used to calculate the faculty resources portion of the ranking are: index score for class size, favoring institutions with smaller class sizes; the proportion of teachers with the highest degree in their field; student:faculty ratio; the proportion of professors who work full time; and faculty salary, which is defined as the average faculty salary (salary only) for assistant, associate, and full professors in the 2020-21 and 2021-22 academic years, adjusted for regional differences in cost of life based on the open-source database of the Bureau of Economic Analysis Regional Price Parity Dataset of December 2021.

UW–Madison maintained its 39th-ranking in graduation and retention rates for the second year in a row with an 89% six-year graduation rate and 95% freshman retention rate.

US News also assessed undergraduate programs in engineering, business, computer science and nursing.

UW-Madison’s undergraduate engineering program ranked 13th overall (three-way tie), up from 15th overall last year (four-way tie) and 7th (two-way tie ) among public doctoral institutions for the third consecutive year. .

Ranked programs include 21st (two-way tie) in Biomedical Engineering, ninth (two-way tie) in Chemical Engineering, 14th in Civil Engineering, 16th in Computer Engineering, 15th (three-way tie) in Electrical Engineering, 25th (two-way tie) pathways) in Environmental Engineering, 12th (two-way link) in Industrial/Manufacturing/Systems Engineering, 14th in Materials Engineering, and 20th (three-way link) in Mechanical Engineering.

The UW–Madison undergraduate business program ranked 19th overall (tie four) and ninth (tie four) in public, both for the second year in a row. It ranked first in both real estate and insurance/risk management (tied).

Other ranked specialties include eighth in marketing, 17th in accounting, 24th (tied at four) in finance and 30th (tied at six) in management.

UW-Madison’s undergraduate computer science program ranked 16th overall (tie at seven), up from 18th last year (tie at four), and eighth (tie at four) among public universities, up from ninth l ‘last year. UW–Madison was ranked 23rd (three-way tie) in artificial intelligence, sixth in computer systems, 17th (four-way tie) in data analytics, and 11th (two-way tie) in programming.

The UW–Madison undergraduate nursing program ranked 22nd (tie at seven) overall and 17th (tie at five) among public universities.

Other categories include:

Best Colleges for Veterans: 18th overall and 10th among audiences (both in three-way matches), up from 20th overall and 14th among audiences last year. Institutions included in this list must be certified for the GI Bill, participate in the Yellow Ribbon Program, or be a public institution that charges in-state tuition to all out-of-state veterans, must have enrolled a minimum of 20 veterans and active duty members in the 2021-22 academic year and must be ranked in the top half of the institution’s overall U.S. News ranking category.

Schools with the best value for money: 23rd among audiences, based on value for money (overall ranking divided by net cost), percentage of undergraduate students receiving need-based scholarships or grants, and percentage of total cost of attendance at a school that was covered by average need-based scholarship or grant.

Academic programs to look for: Institutions are nominated by Presidents/Chancellors/Provosts and Heads of Enrollment/Admissions Management in several areas of the student experience, including Study Abroad, ranked 25th overall (tied at five) and fifth among public (tie at four), and First Year Experience, ranked 42nd (tie at seven) overall and sixth among audiences.

Schools with the most international students: UW-Madison is listed as a school with the most international students, with international students making up 10% of the student body. US News does not rank this measure in their publication, but UW-Madison had the 53rd highest percentage of international students among national universities.

To see the full ranking, click on here.

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Wolfspeed silicon carbide plant for electric vehicle manufacturers https://1cplusplusstreet.com/wolfspeed-silicon-carbide-plant-for-electric-vehicle-manufacturers/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 23:45:02 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/wolfspeed-silicon-carbide-plant-for-electric-vehicle-manufacturers/ Hello and welcome to Protocol Enterprise! Today: Why EV makers are watching silicon carbide chip development closely, the economic downturn could be coming for tech startups, and the side effects of the aggressive strategy to keep the Chinese out of chips advancements. Put the silicon in the carbide A bulletproof material called silicon carbide will […]]]>

Hello and welcome to Protocol Enterprise! Today: Why EV makers are watching silicon carbide chip development closely, the economic downturn could be coming for tech startups, and the side effects of the aggressive strategy to keep the Chinese out of chips advancements.

Put the silicon in the carbide

A bulletproof material called silicon carbide will likely be a key component in making electric vehicles a global reality. Chips forged with the tough-to-work compound can help extend cars’ range and make fast charging dramatically more efficient.

Oolfspeed is betting $5 billion that silicon carbide is that future. The company on Friday announced plans to build a new plant in North Carolina that will boost the company’s manufacturing capacity tenfold.

  • Unlike the silicon wafers used by Intel and TSMC, Wolfspeed grows silicon carbide ingots and cuts them into wafer-sized pieces.
  • The material is difficult to work with and requires furnaces burning at 4,500 degrees Fahrenheit to grow the ingots.
  • Wolfspeed declined to discuss how it cuts the ingots, but cutting the silicon carbide wafers is a difficult enough problem that Taiwan – which is interested in producing chips for electric vehicles – has set up a fund to development in Lithuania.
  • Lithuania has developed laser technology that promises to be very effective in slicing silicon carbide ingots, according to Eric Huang, head of the Taiwan representative office in Lithuania.

Wafer manufacturing is only the beginning of the problem. Because silicon carbide is so hard and heat resistant, Wolfspeed and other manufacturers had to adapt the manufacturing process.

  • Quality control is one of the main issues, Oreste Donzella, executive vice president of electronics, packaging and components at KLA, said at a recent investor conference.
  • KLA is a leader in critical defect detection technology used by chipmakers worldwide to improve yields.
  • “It is very difficult to control the silicon carbide substrate, the quality cell. We have therefore developed many solutions [at] KLA to ensure that we are properly inspecting and measuring the silicon carbide wafer at the substrate level,” Donzella said, according to a Sentieo transcript.
  • Other processes, such as the etching part of chip production, also need to be redesigned to improve the performance of the resulting device.

Tesla already uses silicon carbide to transmit the energy stored in a vehicle’s battery to the motors that turn the wheels, and many of the biggest automakers are expected to follow suit.

  • Wolfspeed has signed an agreement to supply chips to GMas it transitions its fleet to electric, and CEO Gregg Lowe said he expects the rest of the industry to follow suit soon enough.
  • The inverter component in which they are used is a crucial bottleneck, and the use of more energy-efficient chips can result in a 5-15% increase in a vehicle’s range.
  • Donzella didn’t give an exact figure, but said KLA’s automotive revenue has nearly tripled since 2019, given the company’s current forecast for the year.

— Max A. Cherney (E-mail | Twitter)

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RIP good times

As the economy forces companies to consider slowing hiring, layoffs and other cost-cutting measures in addition to lowering expectations, enterprise-focused tech startups are feeling the heat.

“By extension, this is going to come back and impact startups in terms of the growth rates they’re going to see and what their primary goals will be,” said S. Somasegar (“Soma”), managing director of Seattle-based Madrona Venture Group, which invests in Pacific Northwest tech startups. “We’ve already seen some of the portfolio companies only adjust their revenue growth for next year.”

The venture capital landscape is also changing. And with some companies take a step back and slowing down their investments, Soma has some advice for entrepreneurs focused on client companies.

“You should be asking yourself, ‘How do I make sure I have enough funds to have a long enough lead for me to make the progress that I can?’ Soma told Protocol in a recent interview, “The second is to ask, ‘How do I envision effective growth, not just growth at any cost?’ Keep the unit economy in mind.

According to Soma, one of the benefits of current market conditions is the impact on “crazy” corporate valuations.

“Corporate valuations are returning to a more rational level,” he said. “You’re starting to see that over the last eight months in the public market, and I would say over the last six months in the private market, where valuations are getting a little more reasonable.”

— Donna Goodison (E-mail | Twitter)

Old GPUs for Chinese AI?

The fallout from new US export restrictions preventing AI chipmakers from selling in China may not affect a young AI software startup seeking the US market, or even its China-based chief technology officer. China.

But it could affect some people using its software.

“It will have a big impact on researchers and engineers in China,” Yang You, founder of AI optimization startup HPC-AI Tech, told me from his home in Singapore this week.

“Nvidia GPUs in China will be older than Nvidia GPUs in the US. Basically, they’re using a worse product,” You said.

HPC-AI Tech manufactures software called Colossal-IA. The company behind the open-source tool, which streamlines the process of training computationally intensive deep neural networks to make it faster, cheaper and more efficient, recently secured funding from Kai-Fu Lee’s venture capital firm Sinovation Ventures. The company obtained a cheers from nvidia in July.

Registered in Delaware and Singapore, HPC-AI Tech’s CTO is based in China and the company has an office in Beijing.

You said the next chip supply cut won’t affect his business because the software works with any type of GPU. But with a global open source community, Colossal-AI users in China could feel it.

Now, You said he expects the US blockade to kick GPU investment into China into high gear.

“Chinese GPU companies will get more funding,” You told me. “And in the next few years, maybe these big GPU users like Tencent, Alibaba will want to develop their own chips. They may have this motivation.

“Alibaba, ByteDance – they’re basically global companies. They can build data centers in Malaysia, Singapore — [outside] from China. Maybe they have this kind of plan,” You said.

It’s already starting. Alibaba said last year it would build its own server chips based on technology licensed from Arm. ByteDance is also reportedly worked on its own chip-building efforts.

-Kate Kaye (E-mail | Twitter)

Around the company

Intel held an inauguration ceremony on the future site from its chip factory in Ohio, which included participants such as President Biden.

Pendo laid off 5% of its employees in what seems to be another case of a SaaS company assuming the pandemic spending boom was the new normal.

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Thanks for reading – see you Monday!

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Librarian combines the loves of comics, games https://1cplusplusstreet.com/librarian-combines-the-loves-of-comics-games/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 06:03:32 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/librarian-combines-the-loves-of-comics-games/ When David Carter was an undergraduate at UM in the late 1980s, he took a job at the engineering library. He was an engineering student at the time, and the work at the library would help him afford the comic books he collected. “Unbeknownst to me, this (library) job set my career on a completely […]]]>

When David Carter was an undergraduate at UM in the late 1980s, he took a job at the engineering library.

He was an engineering student at the time, and the work at the library would help him afford the comic books he collected.

“Unbeknownst to me, this (library) job set my career on a completely different path,” he said.

The path led Carter to his current position as video game archivist for the Computer and Video Games Archive and comic book librarian – something that combines two childhood sweethearts into one fulfilling career.

David Carter, featured at Canyonlands National Park in Utah, is a video game archivist for the Computer and Video Game Archive and a comic book librarian. (Photo courtesy of David Carter)

“I was a kid in the 1970s and 1980s in the suburbs of Pontiac. What else was I going to do? he asked jokingly. “I never thought we would make a career out of this stuff. I always say 12-year-old Dave would be very impressed with what 50-year-old Dave was doing.

Carter’s exposure and passion for computers began, oddly enough, by taking piano lessons. As preteens, he and his sister took lessons from a family friend, and while his sister was teaching her lesson, Carter was allowed to use that family’s Apple II computer.

While initially only playing games like “Lemonade Stand” on the console, he became intrigued with programming, skimmed through the Apple manual that came with it, and taught himself coding.

His interest and love for comics and comics started even earlier. Carter was enamored with the Peanuts comic strip and had a copy of “Good Ol’ Charlie Brown”—a collection of a few hundred comic strips published between 1955 and 1957—which he read so often it was torn to shreds.

It has a reprint of this book as well as the entire 26-volume collection of “The Complete Peanuts”, hardcover books in the series from the first strip was published in 1950 until the last in 2000.

“I had a stuffed Snoopy, I watched all the Peanuts cartoons on TV, like ‘Charlie Brown Christmas,'” he said. “Peanuts was probably my first comic book love as far as that goes.”

He quickly turned to comics based on superheroes after watching “Super Friends” on TV and his father bought him three comics while he was sick in bed. One of the three books was a Superman comic, and it helped inspire his unique name — superman — when he was a student at UM.

“I got it in 1989. They told me to pick something you’ll remember that has to be eight characters or less, not knowing it would be attached to an email and follow me throughout my life. career,” he said. “It was a little awkward when I was trying to look for jobs out of grad school, but I’m not embarrassed anymore because it kind of fits my job and it’s very memorable. No one ever forgets my email address.

Not very particular about the comics he reads – Carter said he likes “comics for their comedic side” – he eventually amassed a collection of over 40,000 books.

He has reduced the collection somewhat, but still has to use a storage locker to house the majority of his books.

“I’m trying to get rid of them, but I can’t just get rid of them because it’s like cutting off your arm, even though I know I’ll never read them 95% again,” he said. -he declares. “There are some that have sentimental value, some that I could read again, some that I haven’t read yet, and then there are those that I just have to get rid of for one reason or another. But they keep creating new ones.

“I try to break the collector mentality, but it’s hard to do.”

Carter does not have a similar collection of video games. In fact, he has a PlayStation 3 game console but only a handful of games he rarely plays. When he wants to play a video game, he turns to racing or music-themed games or abstract shooters, such as “Geometry Wars” or “Asteroids”.

“So I like driving things, pretending to be a rock star and shooting blobs,” he said.

Pretending to be a rock star takes Carter back to his days playing bass guitar in a number of garage bands. He said he only had one paid gig during his playing days, so a music career was unlikely. For several years before the COVID-19 pandemic, he sang with the Ann Arbor Civic Chorus but has yet to return to the group.

“Maybe one day,” he said. “Music was always something I was into.”

His other interest in gaming stems from his days as an undergrad at UM living in Bursley Hall, which had a small arcade with pinball machines. After eating in the cafeteria, Carter and her roommates and friends spent about an hour in the arcade playing pinball.

“It was every day, so after four years I got pretty good at playing pinball,” he said. “In Kalamazoo, there’s a ‘Pinball at the Zoo’ thing where collectors bring their pinball machines, you pay $17 and you can play pinball all day. Before the pandemic, I would get together with friends from college and we would converge on Kalamazoo and play pinball.

NOMINATE A SPOTLIGHT
  • The weekly Spotlight features members of the university’s faculty and staff. To nominate a candidate, email Record staff at urecord@umich.edu.

“I’m still not bad. I may not have the exact skills I had when I played every day, but it’s kind of like riding a bike.

If the urge to play a video game strikes, Carter can always fire up one of the thousands of games for the 70 game systems available on Computer and Video Game Archive. CVGA reopened in late August in its new home on the fourth floor of the Shapiro Library after a three-month move from the basement of the Duderstadt Library to North Campus.

Carter said the decision was driven in part by feedback from an evaluation report that indicated the majority of CVGA’s use and potential use was in LSA. Preserving old video game consoles is important, he said, to understanding the history of our culture.

While many online archives focus on emulating game systems, CVGA is more focused on preserving original games and consoles.

“Playing an emulated Nintendo game on your computer keyboard isn’t the same as playing it on a real Nintendo with that little square controller on a 1982 CRT TV, which is an experience we can give to people,” he said.

Questions and answers

What memorable workplace moment stands out?

So many, but likely one of many CVGA class sessions where students were tasked with playing games on systems they had never played before.

What can’t you live without?

Well, food, water and shelter of course; but for the purposes of this Q&A, I’ll say ice cream. And the comics.

Name your favorite place on campus.

I like the engineering fountain and reflecting pool on north campus.

What inspires you?

Help people find information. Show them an information tool that they didn’t know existed and that makes their university life easier. We librarians live for it!

What are you currently reading?

“Game Wizards: The Epic Battle for Dungeons & Dragons” by Jon Peterson and “The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue” by VE Schwab

Who has had the greatest influence on your career path?

Probably Jim Ottaviani and Joe Janes, who both showed me non-traditional paths to libraries and mentored me early in my career.

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Dominica State College introduces its student Janice Corbette, shares her experience https://1cplusplusstreet.com/dominica-state-college-introduces-its-student-janice-corbette-shares-her-experience/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 14:39:24 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/dominica-state-college-introduces-its-student-janice-corbette-shares-her-experience/ Dominica State College introduces its student Janice Corbette, shares her experience Dominica: Dominica State College introduced its student Janice Corbette. She received the John and Dorothy Herzog Award, the highest honor of the SPISE program. Discover her experience and help us celebrate one of ours! “Hello, my name is Janice Corbette and I am a […]]]>
Dominica State College introduces its student Janice Corbette, shares her experience

Dominica: Dominica State College introduced its student Janice Corbette. She received the John and Dorothy Herzog Award, the highest honor of the SPISE program.

Discover her experience and help us celebrate one of ours!

“Hello, my name is Janice Corbette and I am a new sophomore at Dominica State College majoring in Chemistry and Biology. This summer I completed the intensive five-week Student Program for Innovation in Science and Engineering (SPISE) held virtually this year due to COVID-19.SPISE is an intensive five-week summer program for Caribbean high school students from across the region, ages 16-18 years, who are interested in scientific fields such as technology, engineering and mathematics and wish to study and explore careers in these disciplines.SPISE is a clone of MIT’s famous MITES program.The short-term goal of SPISE is to address the low number of Caribbean students pursuing higher education in science and engineering and to hone the talents of these students in the region.The long-term goal of this program is to help diversify r the economies of the region and significantly improve the standard of living of the people by further revitalizing technology-driven entrepreneurship in the region.

Admission to SPISE is based on academic transcripts, references from lecturers, and four essays on required subjects. Fortunately, I was accepted into the program along with fourteen other students from the region, including five fellow Dominicans. At SPISE, I was immensely driven by the rigor and pace of the courses, which included calculus, physics, biochemistry, electronics, computer programming and entrepreneurship – all at university level. Collaboration and teamwork between the students were highlighted throughout the five weeks, whether on the weekly issues or the final presentations in front of an audience of more than sixty people. The nights were grueling as 1:00 a.m. became the new 8:00 p.m. for me. I was challenged during these five weeks with five hours of homework each evening and new course material. However, when the program ended on Saturday August 27, I was able to reap the real benefits – improved problem-solving skills and new insights into biochemistry, calculus and more at the awards ceremony. diplomas where I received numerous awards. on all six courses and awarded the SPISE program’s highest honor; the John & Dorothy Herzog Award given to model female and male SPISE students who have demonstrated high overall academic performance in all courses and projects, demonstrated leadership in activities and assignments, and helped their classmates acquire the mastery of the material. Finally, my hard work and effort paid off as I was this year’s SPISE 2022 Best Female Performer.

It was not at all easy. I was guaranteed a challenge, and a challenge that I took on 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, Sunday through Saturday. The caliber of the instructors and their network sometimes made me feel like it was beyond my abilities, but with the incredible support of my SPISE teaching assistants, instructors and friends, as well as my parents, I was able to keep persevering during the five weeks and reap the fruits of my labor. Looking back on SPISE just days after its completion, I realized that I was leaving with a greater knowledge, work ethic, networking opportunities, and amazing friendships with other like-minded people my age in the region. These friendships are genuine and were forged during those long nights that turn into the morning. One of my favorite parts of SPISE was not only building my own electromagnetic levitator involving dual magnetic fields, but also the people I met and learned from, whether cultural differences, musical tastes or future aspirations. SPISE is an experience I will never forget and for which I will be eternally grateful, as I will consider it a stepping stone to achieving my goals and aspirations, including one day enriching the region in a way never seen before. I encourage anyone interested in STEM disciplines to try SPISE; it will definitely pay off,” said Janice Corbette.

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Ukrainians in Dane County wait months amid huge work permit backlogs https://1cplusplusstreet.com/ukrainians-in-dane-county-wait-months-amid-huge-work-permit-backlogs/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 02:42:00 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/ukrainians-in-dane-county-wait-months-amid-huge-work-permit-backlogs/ September 1, 2022 9:42 p.m. Job : September 1, 2022 9:42 p.m. Updated: September 1, 2022 10:22 p.m. STOUGHTON, Wis. – A truck driver, a hospital worker, a school teacher and a piano teacher: Four Ukrainians who have resettled in Stoughton since war brought them to the United States in April have had dynamic careers […]]]>

STOUGHTON, Wis. – A truck driver, a hospital worker, a school teacher and a piano teacher: Four Ukrainians who have resettled in Stoughton since war brought them to the United States in April have had dynamic careers that they left at home.

Here in the United States, they are still waiting to resume those jobs. Federal work permit backlogs, however, have left the Sokor and Romashchenko families in limbo for months since they arrived on humanitarian parole in April.

“We want to be useful,” said Peter Sokor. “We would say in Ukraine, ‘We are sitting on somebody’s shoulders.’ We don’t want to sit like that, we want to work, be useful, do something, pay taxes.

Months of Waiting for Ukrainian Families in Wisconsin, Nationwide

When the families arrived in Wisconsin, a small, rapidly growing local group helped them settle in Stoughton – finding and fitting out their apartments and helping with the costs of rent, food and utilities.

RELATED: ‘We Are So Grateful’: In Stoughton, Growing Ukrainian Refugee Effort and Gaping Need

The Stoughton Resettlement Assistance Program (SRAP) has grown, applied for 501(c)(3) status and is about to add several more Ukrainian families to the growing neighborhood.

But meanwhile, the two families who arrived first – just at the start of the war – are still waiting for their work permits so they can join the workforce and leave behind the charity of others.

“We’ve been waiting for months already and it’s a bit difficult because we don’t just want to sit down,” said Peter, translating for Viacheslav Romashchenko.

Viacheslav – or “Slava” – was a truck driver in Ukraine and, like his wife and two friends, has a job waiting for him in Dane County once his work permit is cleared. He makes the group laugh and more than once they affectionately call him the prankster: when a SRAP co-founder recently asked him if his family needed anything, he was quick to respond.

“Work permit! Work permit! Work permit!” he said. (He and his wife speak little English, but study regularly.)

His wife worked in a home hospital. Peter was a piano teacher now studying to change careers to computer programming at Madison College. Peter’s wife, Kseniia, is a teacher and now volunteers at her daughters’ school in Stoughton while she waits for the permit that would unlock paid employment in the district.

“If our country offered and invited them to our country – which we did, and we are happy that they are here; our community is so much richer for it,” said SPOR co-founder Renee Lushaj. “Then we have to make sure we have the infrastructure and the capacity in place to be able to help them help themselves. They are waiting to do so.

The two families are far from the only Dane County refugees waiting for work permits. The Dane County Immigration Affairs Office, opened in 2017 and housed in its Department of Social Services, currently handles cases for twelve Ukrainian families. Eleven of them are still waiting for their permits; the only family that has theirs arrived before the war.

“We must continue to press our government to really help these families,” said Fabiola Hamdan, head of immigration affairs. “Once you move to another country, financial stability comes first so you can get on with your life.”

Hamdan said work permit backlogs had a similar impact on Afghan refugees who resettled in Dane County (between 70 and 80 have resettled in the county since the Taliban takeover).

“You have your hands tied when that happens,” Hamdan said. “For someone to bring stability to their family, you would like to work.”

As thousands wait, senators call for backlog fixes

This summer, amid a surge of 100,000 Ukrainian refugees and continuing concerns about Afghan refugee job applications, senators from both parties called on United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to improve their wait times for Employment Authorization Document (EAD) applications. .

In June, Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) in a letter to the Department of Homeland Security cited a backlog of applications of 1.5 million, with wait times doubling from 2.6 months to 4.2 months between 2017 and 2022.

“My staff are working with people who have come to the United States ready to work but are unable to cope with these long processing times,” Sen. Shaheen wrote, urging USCIS to take action. “We met young professionals, including refugees from Ukraine and Afghanistan, who are eager to use their skills in the United States but cannot work and support their families.”

In a statement Thursday, Senators Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn) and Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) announced another letter directed at the head of USCIS, saying “thousands” of Ukrainians who had arrived just in April of this year (before the Biden administration implemented United for Ukraine program) were still waiting for their work permit. Some were told to expect to wait a year.

“These delays are not only devastating for refugees seeking to support themselves and their families, they are also a barrier to enriching their new communities with their skills and talents,” the letter said. “It’s all the more frustrating as businesses across the country continue to struggle to find the workers they need to operate.”

US Senators have the ability to apply to USCIS for expedited work permits on behalf of voters. Wisconsin Democratic Senator Tammy Baldwin was contacted on behalf of the Romashchenko and Sokor families, as well as others in the county.

His office tried unsuccessfully to secure expedited permits for one of the families as well as other Ukrainian refugees; for the other family, they are still waiting for additional information.

Based on N3I reviews of communications between family representatives and lawmakers or attorneys, the delays for both families are based on technicalities and elaborate red tape. Both are considering potentially months more before being cleared.

“We have [two] families ready and willing to work,” Lushaj said. “But they’re just waiting for the paperwork. We did everything we could on our side.

News 3 Investigates spoke with a USCIS spokesperson earlier this week, who promised a response by Thursday evening to questions related to backlogs in Wisconsin, but had yet to respond at the time of the publication.

Before the Trump administration, work permits had to be issued within 90 days — a rule that hasn’t been reinstated under the Biden administration as backlogs mount, immigration lawyers tell News 3 Investigates .

Today USCIS says their processing times for Ukrainians arriving on parole (as did the Romashchenko and Sokor families) is 5.5 months.

Meanwhile, families must wait, occupying their time as best they can by caring for their school-aged children, volunteering, and investing in English and other studies.

But they would like to be able to pay their bills on their own.

As Peter said, “I want to be useful to this society.”


Join investigative reporter Naomi Kowles on this week’s show For registration Sunday at 10:30 a.m. to hear more about work permit backlogs hampering refugees’ efforts to move forward.


Want to help with refugee resettlement efforts in Stoughton? Learn more here, or stop by Coffee4All Bistro Cafe September 23-25 ​​for a Ukrainian weekend filled with cultural fare, music, art and more. 10% of profits will be donated to SRAP.


Lane Kimble contributed to this report.

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Computer engineers in the life sciences: how technological advances are increasing demand https://1cplusplusstreet.com/computer-engineers-in-the-life-sciences-how-technological-advances-are-increasing-demand/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 14:55:12 +0000 https://1cplusplusstreet.com/computer-engineers-in-the-life-sciences-how-technological-advances-are-increasing-demand/ The advancement of technology in medical research is not only beneficial for disease prevention, it also creates new jobs to support these technological advances. As more and more medical databases are launched, more people will be needed to manage them, even if they have no medical background. These new roles will help populate genetic databases, […]]]>

The advancement of technology in medical research is not only beneficial for disease prevention, it also creates new jobs to support these technological advances. As more and more medical databases are launched, more people will be needed to manage them, even if they have no medical background.

These new roles will help populate genetic databases, accelerate research cycles, and increase focus on diseases that have traditionally been understudied. And with this progress comes an increased demand for professionals with a background in technology, especially computer engineers, to help make it all happen.

M2Gen’s ORIEN advances technology in cancer research

Created in 2006 from the Moffitt Cancer Center, M2Gen launched the Oncology Research Information Exchange Network (ORIEN), a database to accelerate cancer research. An opt-in, anonymized database, the network aims to accelerate cancer research through an alliance with nearly 20 of the top cancer centers in the United States.

Dr. Oliver Hampton, Vice President of Bioinformatics and Biostatistics at M2Gen, explained how the system works.

“(Each institution) uses its own institutional observational mechanisms to track cancer patients in terms of treatment outcomes, which facilitates internal and external collaborative research,” Hampton said. “One of the cool things about this network is that it’s self-managed, but it shares a philosophy of shared collaboration and shared value. »

The main purpose of the database is to advance cancer research among traditionally marginalized groups. Through the collaborative effort of its 18 participating centers, ORIEN is able to create datasets that represent the patients most in need of new therapies.

“We can observe and track patients with this protocol,” Hampton explained. “We are gaining insights into patients who have not succeeded with the current standard of care, and we are producing targeted datasets for early development that are specific to these at-risk patients.”

Patients must register and give consent before their information and data is entered into the system. This could be the most crucial aspect in developing the ORIEN system and helping it achieve its goals. “The patient can withdraw their consent at any time and eliminate their data from the current system. And so that’s the real power, the commitment, and the real difference that M2Gen delivers in terms of our observing protocol,” Hampton said.

The database and all the information it contains are accessible by all ORIEN’s partner healthcare centres. With so many patient profiles available at the fingertips of researchers nationwide, it is hoped that ORIEN will shorten diagnostic and treatment times and also accelerate cancer research.

The M2Gen database has also added socio-economic benefits. By leveraging patient data from all walks of life, ORIEN is able to improve studies of cancers that have not only been often overlooked, but often disproportionately affect people of color. In this way, technology is used to help democratize healthcare.

“One of our major memberships is at Moorehouse, a traditionally African-American educational institution,” Hampton says. “We have internships at USC in Los Angeles that have specific ties to the LA County hospital system as well as the University of New Mexico and Albuquerque University in Oklahoma. USC and LA traditionally cover Latin American populations, and the third, Oklahoma, generally covers tribal nations that are severely underrepresented in I would say any medical field, so that’s extremely positive. Now, patients know they have the choice to be part of this network.

Data collected by ORIEN from these institutions may then be used by other ORIEN members throughout the United States. This means that regions that may have previously lacked data on marginalized groups can now accelerate research into several different cancers.

Growing demand for computer engineers

The launch of ORIEN also generated the need for support from computer engineers. Because medical professionals aren’t always computer tech-savvy, Hampton and M2Gen sought help from a third-party source.

“Part of our investment that took place in April 2021 was a partnership with Microsoft. And one of the things that has come out of this partnership is the technical transitions and the evolutions in the business background that are happening today,” Hampton said.

Support was essential to the development of technology that would power the system and protect patient privacy. With the help of IT developers, systems were created to manage data sharing and security, as well as ensure privacy across ORIEN’s 18 partner facilities.

“When you start talking about molecular data, DNA sequence in RNA sequencing, results, recalculation, all kinds of queries that can be made and algorithms that can be applied…[these are] all the digital analytics that we didn’t even think of today,” Hampton explained.

With 20,000 patients and three petabytes of data (or 3,000 terabytes), ORIEN needs skilled IT engineers to keep the database running smoothly.

“The problem we faced was how to create collaborative research platforms that allow people to interact with the data, bring their own analysis to the data, and bring their own datasets to complete the research. analysis to even increase the power beyond what we’re trying to do in the long term,” Hampton said.

Ultimately, Hampton said, the goal is to make the study of cancer treatment a data-driven enterprise.

“We are trying to figure out how we can take advantage of big data analytics, big data science, and algorithmic components. We review advances in machine learning and AI to help provide insights to those developing new therapies. The goal is to use this information to help make key decisions.

How computer engineers can enter the field

All this requires more computer engineers in the medical field. For those looking to go that route, Hampton says go for it, but techs should also have a genuine interest in medical research.

Hampton says he was initially interested in both biology and astronomy, because “the most complex questions are either the intricacies of the cosmos or the intricacies of cellular communication”, and that curiosity is what drives him. pushed him in his career. Although no medical background is necessary to become a computer engineer in the medical world, a healthy curiosity about biology and medicine is important.

“Cancer is a genomic disease, and so we can understand the evolutionary context that has changed the programming of individual normal cells. We can figure out how to beat it,” Hampton says. “Think about this problem and think about the technology tools you need to apply today.”

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